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World War II: USA
Aircraft of the United States in WWII.
Hosted by Rowan Baylis
Finishing the seam
azizmaz
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United States
Joined: October 18, 2002
KitMaker: 174 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2003 - 05:10 AM UTC
I have not built an airplane many years but would like to build one now. I just have one question before I begin. What are the best methods for getting the seam line out of the fuselage?
ladymodelbuilder
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Virginia, United States
Joined: February 26, 2002
KitMaker: 1,218 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2003 - 05:44 AM UTC
There's two ways to choose from. You can use putty and after it dries, wet sand it . There's also a way I found on the Aircraft Resourse Center's web page. Go head und putty the seam line, then use finger nail polish remover to remove the putty from the plastic. This method saves the panel lines better. Give them both a try. You can find the artilce with pictures at http://www.aircraftresoursecenter.com

The name of the article is "Sanding without sandpaper" I think.....

I hope this heps ya
azizmaz
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United States
Joined: October 18, 2002
KitMaker: 174 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2003 - 05:52 AM UTC
I will have to give it a try. I don't seem to have much luck with seams using sqaudron putty.
ladymodelbuilder
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Virginia, United States
Joined: February 26, 2002
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Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2003 - 05:57 AM UTC
Azizmaz, Any kind of putty should work. I use Squadron's White putty and so far haven't had any problem.
azizmaz
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United States
Joined: October 18, 2002
KitMaker: 174 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2003 - 06:06 AM UTC
I read on that site about a guy that uses white glue for filling in seams. he says it does not need any sanding after your done. Have you ever tried that?
mj
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Illinois, United States
Joined: March 16, 2002
KitMaker: 1,331 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2003 - 06:07 AM UTC
I also read the article Penny refers to on ARC, and have used the "nail-polish remover" method ever since. Dipping a Q-tip into the remover and running it along the seam of putty works like a charm. It can be hazardous however. The last time I was in the check-out line of the pharmacy with my nail polish remover and a bunch of emory boards, the looks I got compelled me to also request a fifth of Jack Daniels and a box of extra-large condoms.

Mike

azizmaz
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United States
Joined: October 18, 2002
KitMaker: 174 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2003 - 06:12 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I also read the article Penny refers to on ARC, and have used the "nail-polish remover" method ever since. Dipping a Q-tip into the remover and running it along the seam of putty works like a charm. It can be hazardous however. The last time I was in the check-out line of the pharmacy with my nail polish remover and a bunch of emory boards, the looks I got compelled me to also request a fifth of Jack Daniels and a box of extra-large condoms.

Mike


#:-)

My wife and I own a Salon so that won't be a problem since we already have gallons of the stuff on hand.
modelguy2
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Ohio, United States
Joined: March 09, 2002
KitMaker: 818 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2003 - 06:37 AM UTC
http://www.armorama.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=Sections&file=index&req=viewarticle&artid=63


azizmaz
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United States
Joined: October 18, 2002
KitMaker: 174 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2003 - 08:48 AM UTC

Quoted Text

There's two ways to choose from. You can use putty and after it dries, wet sand it . There's also a way I found on the Aircraft Resourse Center's web page. Go head und putty the seam line, then use finger nail polish remover to remove the putty from the plastic. This method saves the panel lines better. Give them both a try. You can find the artilce with pictures at http://www.aircraftresoursecenter.com

The name of the article is "Sanding without sandpaper" I think.....

I hope this heps ya




I could'nt find the article on ARC but as it turns out I had printed the same article back in september of 2001 and tucked it away in my file cabnet. I totally forgot about it until you mentioned it. I knew someday it would come in handy so I was thinking ahead by printing it out but it's oh so easy to forget about things. Anyway that looks like a great way to deal with the seams. :-)
Holdfast
Staff MemberPresident
IPMS-UK KITMAKER BRANCH
#056
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England - South West, United Kingdom
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Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2003 - 07:37 PM UTC
Hi azizmaz, to help eliminate the seam, first make sure that the halves fit perfectly. Or as near perfectly as possible. Sanding both halves flat, or sometimes removing the locating pins can help. :-)
Mal
mac
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United States
Joined: April 16, 2002
KitMaker: 151 posts
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Posted: Thursday, January 23, 2003 - 04:45 AM UTC
Ah, my favorite subject! To me this has been my unachievable Holy Grail in model building, but I think I'm getting closer. I'm assuming you mean not only filling any gaps, but removing the seam line completely even on a kit with a perfect fit. I've read everything I can find about this and always ask a modeler how they do it when I see one I like. I'll add me $.02. First, as Holdfast says make sure you get a good fit. This is essential. Here are some methods I've tried or heard about:

1) For filling gaps the putty/nail polish remover method works great. I only use this now with putty. I use Squadron's white putty with no problem.
2) In one of Paul Boyer's books he suggests holding the fuselage together and running glue off a brush into the seam. Capillary action should suck it in. I haven't had much luck with this since any glue in a jar hates me.
3) Use CA glue after joining the halves with plastic glue. Apply it minimally on top of the seam and let it begin to dry, but not fully. Then sand it down. This should fill any remaining gap. I've had a hard time with this one since the glue is always too soft or hard.
4) Liquid Paper can fill shallow gaps. It can also be smoothed out and cleaned up with water. I use it in some places but find that for fuselage seams it needs too many applications.
5) My local IPMS group's prez builds the most flawless bf109's. He suggests using generous amounts of plastic glue to join the halves. Let it dry. After that use a scribing tool or exacto to scrape off any extra glue or melted plastic that has oozed out then sand, sand, sand, and polish. Just keep sanding until you get it perfect. Finally, rescribe the detail you've sanded off. Make sure those panel lines don't "fade away". This is the method I've been pursuing and, like I said, I haven't perfected it yet but I have hope.

Also, always watch out for flat spots. I just purchased a Flexi-File to avoid this. (Now maybe I can fix my Avenger )

...Kevin