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Dioramas
Do you love dioramas & vignettes? We sure do.
"Separate the tanks from the Infantry"
DanEgan
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United States
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Posted: Thursday, September 10, 2020 - 08:19 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I believe this was the best medium arty piece in service during that war. For many reasons.

And what are they? Aside from very good range I don't think the 25 pounder actually holds up very well against contemporary divisional guns.

Of course British artillery methods were outstanding, but your claim is about the gun itself.
jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: April 10, 2011
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Posted: Thursday, September 10, 2020 - 08:35 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

I believe this was the best medium arty piece in service during that war. For many reasons.

And what are they? Aside from very good range I don't think the 25 pounder actually holds up very well against contemporary divisional guns.

Of course British artillery methods were outstanding, but your claim is about the gun itself.



Mainly the design itself. Robust and un complicated with the main selling point ( for me ) is the round platform that can be lowered to enable the gun to be swung in a complete circle,thus able to address targets in any zip code. The split trail guns common at that time were way more cumbersome while trying to perform that maneuver. I read of a german 150mm crew that was ready to drop dead after serving their piece during a major Russian attack and having to continuously change compass points for fire missions,
I take it as a nod to this guns designers that our 105mm light howitzer in the 82nd Abn bears a remarkable resemblance.
Just my uninformed opinion as I am no redleg and only carried various forms of hand held bullet launchers.
J
Golikell
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Noord-Holland, Netherlands
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Posted: Thursday, September 10, 2020 - 06:34 PM UTC
I also now that more than one German POW asked if they could see the belt fed guns of the Brits... The Brit 25 pounders could keep up such an incredible rate of fire of fire that the Germans genuinely believed they were belt fed... Nice reading about this are the books written by George Blackburn: Where the Hell Are the Guns, The Guns of Normandy and The Guns of Victory.
cheyenne
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New Jersey, United States
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Posted: Thursday, September 10, 2020 - 09:30 PM UTC
Beauty JR , will this be part of the bigger picture ?
G-man69
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England - South West, United Kingdom
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Posted: Friday, September 11, 2020 - 03:13 AM UTC
Hi Jerry,

Nice looking piece, .

Intrigued to know what's in the box that's hiding top left as it looks like it might be a Bronco goody?

Your 25pdr and the hidden box reminds me that Bronco were going to make Morris Field Artillery Tractor Quad Mk.II, and the box art suggested it might come with gun and limber...I wonder what happened to that proposal?

Cheers, ,

G
Hohenstaufen
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Joined: December 13, 2004
KitMaker: 2,188 posts
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Posted: Friday, September 11, 2020 - 05:28 AM UTC
Jerry,
Nice infantryman and love the 25 Pdr!


Quoted Text

I believe this was the best medium arty piece in service during that war. For many reasons.
And what are they? Aside from very good range I don't think the 25 pounder actually holds up very well against contemporary divisional guns.

Of course British artillery methods were outstanding, but your claim is about the gun itself.



Dan, the 25Pdr was a game changer in artillery. For a start it was often referred to as the Gun/How, as it combined the abilities of both. It can fire high trajectory like a howitzer and also flat trajectory. It was also issued with A/T ammunition. I've seen one being fired alongside a more modern piece (the 105mm Light Gun) and the rate of fire was fantastic, especially considering that it's not fixed ammunition. Others have mentioned the quick training ability given by the ground wheel. It was last used in action in 1971 at Mirbat in Oman by the SAS.
jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: April 10, 2011
KitMaker: 7,940 posts
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Posted: Sunday, September 13, 2020 - 04:53 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I also now that more than one German POW asked if they could see the belt fed guns of the Brits... The Brit 25 pounders could keep up such an incredible rate of fire of fire that the Germans genuinely believed they were belt fed... Nice reading about this are the books written by George Blackburn: Where the Hell Are the Guns, The Guns of Normandy and The Guns of Victory.

Thanks buddy!
I will add those books to the list of ones to look for.
J
jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
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Posted: Sunday, September 13, 2020 - 04:54 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Beauty JR , will this be part of the bigger picture ?



Thanks buddy! Yes,is the short answer.
J
jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: April 10, 2011
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Posted: Sunday, September 13, 2020 - 04:55 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Hi Jerry,

Nice looking piece, .

Intrigued to know what's in the box that's hiding top left as it looks like it might be a Bronco goody?

Your 25pdr and the hidden box reminds me that Bronco were going to make Morris Field Artillery Tractor Quad Mk.II, and the box art suggested it might come with gun and limber...I wonder what happened to that proposal?

Cheers, ,



G





Maybe the virus slowdown cause a delay ? Who knows. I love Bronco stuff though and that box is a figgie set I will be using.
J
jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: April 10, 2011
KitMaker: 7,940 posts
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Posted: Sunday, September 13, 2020 - 04:57 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Jerry,
Nice infantryman and love the 25 Pdr!


Quoted Text

I believe this was the best medium arty piece in service during that war. For many reasons.
And what are they? Aside from very good range I don't think the 25 pounder actually holds up very well against contemporary divisional guns.

Of course British artillery methods were outstanding, but your claim is about the gun itself.



Dan, the 25Pdr was a game changer in artillery. For a start it was often referred to as the Gun/How, as it combined the abilities of both. It can fire high trajectory like a howitzer and also flat trajectory. It was also issued with A/T ammunition. I've seen one being fired alongside a more modern piece (the 105mm Light Gun) and the rate of fire was fantastic, especially considering that it's not fixed ammunition. Others have mentioned the quick training ability given by the ground wheel. It was last used in action in 1971 at Mirbat in Oman by the SAS.



Thanks for the support,both in my figs and in the defense of the 25'er! You wrote what I should've!
J
jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: April 10, 2011
KitMaker: 7,940 posts
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Posted: Sunday, September 13, 2020 - 05:01 AM UTC
Started to build up a rudimentary gunsight,not included in the kit. Both direct and indirect sights are shown.
Unpainted


Thanks for looking and lurking!
J



G-man69
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England - South West, United Kingdom
Joined: October 17, 2017
KitMaker: 943 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 - 12:54 AM UTC
Hi Jerry,

That gunsight is a miniature work of art, excellent scratch build, .

Cheers,

G
jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
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Posted: Tuesday, September 22, 2020 - 02:57 AM UTC
Thanks G-man for the excellent compliment! It wasn't my best scratchbuild but it gives the "impression" I suppose.

Here are two stalwart gunners for the 25pounder.
Both modified a bit from stock.

The Rado fig used as a gun chief



And a Bronco fig from their AT crew set also modified and using a Bronco HE round from their Limber kit. Nice decals.The face is quite good for a plastic kit I think.



BootsDMS
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England - South West, United Kingdom
Joined: February 08, 2012
KitMaker: 978 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, September 22, 2020 - 05:53 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Thanks G-man for the excellent compliment! It wasn't my best scratchbuild but it gives the "impression" I suppose.

Here are two stalwart gunners for the 25pounder.
Both modified a bit from stock.

The Rado fig used as a gun chief



And a Bronco fig from their AT crew set also modified and using a Bronco HE round from their Limber kit. Nice decals.The face is quite good for a plastic kit I think.






Jerry,

'Love 'em - as always, but don't forget the Royal Artillery title (above the Divisional badge following the curvature of the shoulder - red lettering on blue), or the Arm of Service strip below the badge - red and blue.

Just for info the full Corporal as the Gun Chief would be known in British Army parlance as a Bombardier", but you probably knew that.

Brian
jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: April 10, 2011
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Posted: Tuesday, September 22, 2020 - 06:51 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Thanks G-man for the excellent compliment! It wasn't my best scratchbuild but it gives the "impression" I suppose.

Here are two stalwart gunners for the 25pounder.
Both modified a bit from stock.

The Rado fig used as a gun chief



And a Bronco fig from their AT crew set also modified and using a Bronco HE round from their Limber kit. Nice decals.The face is quite good for a plastic kit I think.






Jerry,

'Love 'em - as always, but don't forget the Royal Artillery title (above the Divisional badge following the curvature of the shoulder - red lettering on blue), or the Arm of Service strip below the badge - red and blue.

Just for info the full Corporal as the Gun Chief would be known in British Army parlance as a Bombardier", but you probably knew that.

Brian


Thanks,
I was hoping you would weigh in as I didn't know if the RA had the scroll like the Inf Regts had. So would they wear the scroll and also the bars below the rampant Lion ? Or wear either-or.?
J
BootsDMS
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England - South West, United Kingdom
Joined: February 08, 2012
KitMaker: 978 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, September 22, 2020 - 07:05 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Thanks G-man for the excellent compliment! It wasn't my best scratchbuild but it gives the "impression" I suppose.

Here are two stalwart gunners for the 25pounder.
Both modified a bit from stock.

The Rado fig used as a gun chief



And a Bronco fig from their AT crew set also modified and using a Bronco HE round from their Limber kit. Nice decals.The face is quite good for a plastic kit I think.






Jerry,

'Love 'em - as always, but don't forget the Royal Artillery title (above the Divisional badge following the curvature of the shoulder - red lettering on blue), or the Arm of Service strip below the badge - red and blue.

Just for info the full Corporal as the Gun Chief would be known in British Army parlance as a Bombardier", but you probably knew that.

Brian


Thanks,
I was hoping you would weigh in as I didn't know if the RA had the scroll like the Inf Regts had. So would they wear the scroll and also the bars below the rampant Lion ? Or wear either-or.?
J



Jerry,

Yup; all parts of the British Army (or pretty much) had the Corps/Regiment on the sleeve at the top of the shoulder.

The Army of Service strip (red and blue but red forward if that makes sense) would then be below the Formation badge, in this case - as you note - the rampant lion of 15th Scottish Division.

No seniority "bars" as the Infantry had as that was the Infantry being "brigaded" as it were; the RA Field Regiments were Divisional Troops so the seniority bar system didn't apply.

You could, were you so inclined add long service/wound stripes or even trade/qualification badges but therein lies a whole new bag of worms(!)

No, cracking figures Jerry, keep it up.

Brian
jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: April 10, 2011
KitMaker: 7,940 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, September 22, 2020 - 07:26 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Thanks G-man for the excellent compliment! It wasn't my best scratchbuild but it gives the "impression" I suppose.

Here are two stalwart gunners for the 25pounder.
Both modified a bit from stock.

The Rado fig used as a gun chief



And a Bronco fig from their AT crew set also modified and using a Bronco HE round from their Limber kit. Nice decals.The face is quite good for a plastic kit I think.






Jerry,

'Love 'em - as always, but don't forget the Royal Artillery title (above the Divisional badge following the curvature of the shoulder - red lettering on blue), or the Arm of Service strip below the badge - red and blue.

Just for info the full Corporal as the Gun Chief would be known in British Army parlance as a Bombardier", but you probably knew that.

Brian


Thanks,
I was hoping you would weigh in as I didn't know if the RA had the scroll like the Inf Regts had. So would they wear the scroll and also the bars below the rampant Lion ? Or wear either-or.?
J



Jerry,

Yup; all parts of the British Army (or pretty much) had the Corps/Regiment on the sleeve at the top of the shoulder.

The Army of Service strip (red and blue but red forward if that makes sense) would then be below the Formation badge, in this case - as you note - the rampant lion of 15th Scottish Division.

No seniority "bars" as the Infantry had as that was the Infantry being "brigaded" as it were; the RA Field Regiments were Divisional Troops so the seniority bar system didn't apply.

You could, were you so inclined add long service/wound stripes or even trade/qualification badges but therein lies a whole new bag of worms(!)

No, cracking figures Jerry, keep it up.

Brian


Ok good to know! I actually do know what red forward means! LoL I am slowly learning stuff. Slowly.
I wanted to show qual badges as well as others. I will have to approach the great satin google for that. Hat in hand.
BootsDMS
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England - South West, United Kingdom
Joined: February 08, 2012
KitMaker: 978 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, September 22, 2020 - 07:46 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Thanks G-man for the excellent compliment! It wasn't my best scratchbuild but it gives the "impression" I suppose.

Here are two stalwart gunners for the 25pounder.
Both modified a bit from stock.

The Rado fig used as a gun chief



And a Bronco fig from their AT crew set also modified and using a Bronco HE round from their Limber kit. Nice decals.The face is quite good for a plastic kit I think.






Jerry,

'Love 'em - as always, but don't forget the Royal Artillery title (above the Divisional badge following the curvature of the shoulder - red lettering on blue), or the Arm of Service strip below the badge - red and blue.

Just for info the full Corporal as the Gun Chief would be known in British Army parlance as a Bombardier", but you probably knew that.

Brian


Thanks,
I was hoping you would weigh in as I didn't know if the RA had the scroll like the Inf Regts had. So would they wear the scroll and also the bars below the rampant Lion ? Or wear either-or.?
J



Jerry,

Yup; all parts of the British Army (or pretty much) had the Corps/Regiment on the sleeve at the top of the shoulder.

The Army of Service strip (red and blue but red forward if that makes sense) would then be below the Formation badge, in this case - as you note - the rampant lion of 15th Scottish Division.

No seniority "bars" as the Infantry had as that was the Infantry being "brigaded" as it were; the RA Field Regiments were Divisional Troops so the seniority bar system didn't apply.

You could, were you so inclined add long service/wound stripes or even trade/qualification badges but therein lies a whole new bag of worms(!)

No, cracking figures Jerry, keep it up.

Brian


Ok good to know! I actually do know what red forward means! LoL I am slowly learning stuff. Slowly.
I wanted to show qual badges as well as others. I will have to approach the great satin google for that. Hat in hand.

]
]

Sorry Jerry, I can come across as a patronising git!

I wouldn't, upon reflection, worry too much about trade badges - if one of your Gunner figures is a qualified Driver than all well and good but it's very complicated working out what was what: eg, were some Gunner trades "A" class tradesman, or "B" Class tradesman - I have no idea so it's all a bit fiendish?

Long Service stripes are a bit easier as are Good Conduct ones; if you really feel the need then add these but otherwise I would think the uniforms will look busy enough - and colourful even.

Brian
jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: April 10, 2011
KitMaker: 7,940 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, September 22, 2020 - 07:54 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Thanks G-man for the excellent compliment! It wasn't my best scratchbuild but it gives the "impression" I suppose.

Here are two stalwart gunners for the 25pounder.
Both modified a bit from stock.

The Rado fig used as a gun chief



And a Bronco fig from their AT crew set also modified and using a Bronco HE round from their Limber kit. Nice decals.The face is quite good for a plastic kit I think.






Jerry,

'Love 'em - as always, but don't forget the Royal Artillery title (above the Divisional badge following the curvature of the shoulder - red lettering on blue), or the Arm of Service strip below the badge - red and blue.

Just for info the full Corporal as the Gun Chief would be known in British Army parlance as a Bombardier", but you probably knew that.

Brian


Thanks,
I was hoping you would weigh in as I didn't know if the RA had the scroll like the Inf Regts had. So would they wear the scroll and also the bars below the rampant Lion ? Or wear either-or.?
J



Jerry,

Yup; all parts of the British Army (or pretty much) had the Corps/Regiment on the sleeve at the top of the shoulder.

The Army of Service strip (red and blue but red forward if that makes sense) would then be below the Formation badge, in this case - as you note - the rampant lion of 15th Scottish Division.

No seniority "bars" as the Infantry had as that was the Infantry being "brigaded" as it were; the RA Field Regiments were Divisional Troops so the seniority bar system didn't apply.

You could, were you so inclined add long service/wound stripes or even trade/qualification badges but therein lies a whole new bag of worms(!)

No, cracking figures Jerry, keep it up.

Brian


Ok good to know! I actually do know what red forward means! LoL I am slowly learning stuff. Slowly.
I wanted to show qual badges as well as others. I will have to approach the great satin google for that. Hat in hand.

]
]

Sorry Jerry, I can come across as a patronising git!

I wouldn't, upon reflection, worry too much about trade badges - if one of your Gunner figures is a qualified Driver than all well and good but it's very complicated working out what was what: eg, were some Gunner trades "A" class tradesman, or "B" Class tradesman - I have no idea so it's all a bit fiendish?

Long Service stripes are a bit easier as are Good Conduct ones; if you really feel the need then add these but otherwise I would think the uniforms will look busy enough - and colourful even.

Brian



A quick and pleasant visit to Google found the qual badge I will use. Straightforward round OD green with white wreath and the word "gun" in center. Fairly obvious. I will add a red chevron on sleeves end for kicks.
Do not feel like a git,I need all the help I can get here with this quagmire of new stuff.
J
Dioramartin
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New South Wales, Australia
Joined: May 04, 2016
KitMaker: 1,475 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, September 22, 2020 - 12:45 PM UTC
One day the story will be told of how the British army cunningly devised a system of badges that, in the event of capture, would occupy and confuse entire divisions of enemy captors…and model-makers for centuries to come. Makes Ultra/Enigma look like a game of solitaire. Superb figures JR, you might have heard my sharp intake of breath (in awe) from over there when I saw those perfect khaki colour/shades, I always had the most difficulty to nail that - in fact I never have. 110%
G-man69
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England - South West, United Kingdom
Joined: October 17, 2017
KitMaker: 943 posts
AeroScale: 2 posts
Posted: Wednesday, September 23, 2020 - 01:24 AM UTC
Hi Jerry,

The two gun crew figures are absolutely brilliant, I especially like the gun chief, and the detail that has gone into painting the loader's shell is outstanding...it inspires many of us to go that extra mile with the small details, .

Cheers, ,

G
jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: April 10, 2011
KitMaker: 7,940 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, September 23, 2020 - 01:39 AM UTC
Tim,you may have gotten to the core issue there! Conforming to the age old axiom: If you can't dazzle them with brilliance, baffle them with BS."
G-thanks for the very generous comment buddy!
Brian-Here we go.
Bombadier patch and proper unit patches as well as long service chevrons. I may still add a wound stripe.





J
PolishBrigade12
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Washington, United States
Joined: January 31, 2009
KitMaker: 380 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, September 23, 2020 - 04:50 AM UTC
Excellent fig work jerry, love the rifleman and the blow grass look, excellent pics. The 25pndr looks great from here. You are a dio-machine Bro!
BootsDMS
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England - South West, United Kingdom
Joined: February 08, 2012
KitMaker: 978 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, September 23, 2020 - 09:00 AM UTC
Sweet Jerry.

Brian
jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: April 10, 2011
KitMaker: 7,940 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, September 23, 2020 - 10:50 AM UTC
Thanks Steve! Kind words man.
Brian-thanks for your help in this as always.
J