login   |    register
General Aircraft: Tips & Techniques
Discussions on specific A/C building techniques.
What Tool?
armouredcharmer
_VISITCOMMUNITY
England - East Anglia, United Kingdom
Joined: June 09, 2009
KitMaker: 670 posts
AeroScale: 175 posts
Posted: Monday, November 27, 2017 - 11:56 AM UTC
Hi Gang, I have recently managed to finally get one of my dream kits, The HobbyCraft 1/32nd A-36. My Problem is that like the majority of Mustang kits she has "solid" Wheel bays (no hollow to the rear of the bays),to this end I purchased CMK resin wheel bays to help with this.
What I`d really like to know is what tool can other modelers recommend to remove the kit bays?, I don't want to use a Dremel to remove this as I don't want to use something that aggressive as I`ve tried this before with disastrous results.
A little Help here?
GazzaS
#424
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Queensland, Australia
Joined: April 23, 2015
KitMaker: 4,645 posts
AeroScale: 1,938 posts
Posted: Monday, November 27, 2017 - 02:48 PM UTC
Although you say you don't want to use a Dremel, I always use my Dremel for removing large bits of plastic.

But let me explain. I also have the Dremel drill press and various bits lat look like enlarged engraving bits.

The drill press holds the Dremel completely still. The Dremel itself is set at 5000rpm...it's lowest setting.

Then, with two hands on the plastic part, I maneuver wherever I want the plastic removed. The plastic comes off like little bits of snow. It takes concentration, but is really handy for thinning the areas around wheel wells, louvres, and cartridge ejection ports.

Gaz
Berwickboy
_VISITCOMMUNITY
England - East Midlands, United Kingdom
Joined: April 27, 2013
KitMaker: 450 posts
AeroScale: 387 posts
Posted: Monday, November 27, 2017 - 08:19 PM UTC
You could try using a flexible razor saw like the Airwaves set sold by Hannants. https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/AEM043
rdt1953
_VISITCOMMUNITY
New Jersey, United States
Joined: February 06, 2015
KitMaker: 1,094 posts
AeroScale: 896 posts
Posted: Monday, November 27, 2017 - 08:25 PM UTC
I second Mikes' opinion - flexible razor saw would be my choice if you have room to use it
Richard
Joel_W
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
AUTOMODELER
_VISITCOMMUNITY
New York, United States
Joined: December 04, 2010
KitMaker: 11,655 posts
AeroScale: 7,410 posts
Posted: Monday, November 27, 2017 - 09:54 PM UTC
Danny,
Not being familiar with kit and thus the wheel wells I googled it and found a suitable picture.



There is a few issues you need to decide on prior to removal of the wheel well, and that's the lip that will be created on the inside of the bottom of wing, and if you need it level with the rest of the inner surface, or can live with it being beveled. My guess is level, then sand for a more scale effect.

Since you don't want to use a Dremel, I'd start off with a hand drill and the largest bit you have. Drill holes all around the bottom of the well, then cut the plastic from one hole to the next and the bottom will drop out. I'd also drill holes in the sides the best I can then cut out sections of the side walls. What's left needs to be cut off little by little leaving a slight lip. then a hobby chisel so that you can remove the remaining wheel side walls while leaving the inner wing surface level.

Joel
Merlin
Staff MemberSenior Editor
AEROSCALE
#017
_VISITCOMMUNITY
United Kingdom
Joined: June 11, 2003
KitMaker: 17,534 posts
AeroScale: 12,766 posts
Posted: Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 03:06 AM UTC
Hi Danny

I'd tackle a job like this the way Joel suggests, by drilling a series of closely spaced holes and joining them up. I use an Archimedes drill, which saves on elbow grease, but is very controllable - they are very cheap and I find them a perfect mid-way house between a twist-drill and a power tool.

All the best

Rowan
c4willy
#305
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Christchurch, New Zealand
Joined: February 01, 2006
KitMaker: 1,673 posts
AeroScale: 1,517 posts
Posted: Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 07:59 AM UTC
Hi Danny as something from left field cotton thread will act like a fine saw and you can simply pull it back and forth to cut through both sides of the well at once. I've used it to make fine detail cuts in armour building. Simply tie either end to a length of dowel to make it easy to saw with. The part Will also have to be firmly held in place while you cut. But the best part is it's a cheap tool to use and replace. Just make sure the thread is cotton as synthetic threads can melt if the heat builds up from friction.
Scarred
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: March 11, 2016
KitMaker: 1,765 posts
AeroScale: 27 posts
Posted: Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 11:11 AM UTC
I've cut out panels and flaps using a scribe tool and running it repeatedly over the line until it cut thru the plastic. It is time consuming but it didn't damage the panel I was cutting out or surrounding area.
armouredcharmer
_VISITCOMMUNITY
England - East Anglia, United Kingdom
Joined: June 09, 2009
KitMaker: 670 posts
AeroScale: 175 posts
Posted: Sunday, December 17, 2017 - 01:40 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Danny,
Not being familiar with kit and thus the wheel wells I googled it and found a suitable picture.



There is a few issues you need to decide on prior to removal of the wheel well, and that's the lip that will be created on the inside of the bottom of wing, and if you need it level with the rest of the inner surface, or can live with it being beveled. My guess is level, then sand for a more scale effect.

Since you don't want to use a Dremel, I'd start off with a hand drill and the largest bit you have. Drill holes all around the bottom of the well, then cut the plastic from one hole to the next and the bottom will drop out. I'd also drill holes in the sides the best I can then cut out sections of the side walls. What's left needs to be cut off little by little leaving a slight lip. then a hobby chisel so that you can remove the remaining wheel side walls while leaving the inner wing surface level.

Joel



Thanks for all the replies guys, I think I`ll try this method as it is the least aggressive of all. My experience with "dremmeling" stems from removing parts on armour models which has led to cutting too deeply or the parts melting or hot loose plastic swarf melting surface detail.