login   |    register
Armor/AFV: AA/AT/Artillery
For discussions about artillery and anti-aircraft or anti-tank guns.
Hosted by Darren Baker
M1 155mm
KurtLaughlin
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: January 18, 2003
KitMaker: 2,401 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Wednesday, October 25, 2017 - 05:18 AM UTC
Here's a good WW II image taken on a cloudy day:



When ready to fire it just looks like a matte silver.

KL
Jacques
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Minnesota, United States
Joined: March 04, 2003
KitMaker: 4,630 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Wednesday, October 25, 2017 - 05:25 AM UTC
Thank God I was a 13F and never a Gun Bunny!
27-1025
_VISITCOMMUNITY
North Carolina, United States
Joined: September 16, 2004
KitMaker: 1,273 posts
AeroScale: 39 posts
Posted: Wednesday, October 25, 2017 - 06:52 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text

From the very little I have heard/read/seen about the war in Vietnam I find the poses a little hard to believe. The guy standing by the radio looks as if he has a steel rod up his backside ...



The positions are correct, as each crewmember has a specific spot to occupy. The radioman does look a little formal, pretty much standing at attention. (Un)fortunately, the figures are not included in the kit. Too bad as there are not any good Vietnam artillery figures out there.

Actual Vietnam artillery crewmen on an M114A1.






You have received a bunch of good information. Just as a note about the barrel, it is bare metal but would have a thin coat of gun grease. Look at the photos and you will see the coating.

You will also have a grease coating on the elevation and traverse gears.

Just some additional thoughts. Even though it is built to the M114 VN version you can see what I did with the barrel here

http://www.redleg2scale.com/model%20gallery/M114.html

Hope that helps

Rounds Complete!!



Much appreciated. Snagged the M114 for $15.00 today. Will try to build it in firing mode in the near future.
27-1025
_VISITCOMMUNITY
North Carolina, United States
Joined: September 16, 2004
KitMaker: 1,273 posts
AeroScale: 39 posts
Posted: Wednesday, October 25, 2017 - 06:54 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Here's a good WW II image taken on a cloudy day:



When ready to fire it just looks like a matte silver.

KL



Awesome picture! Any idea as to the unit?
trickymissfit
Joined: October 03, 2007
KitMaker: 1,382 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Wednesday, October 25, 2017 - 10:06 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Thank God I was a 13F and never a Gun Bunny!



those guys in the WWII photo won't be shooting too much. Ground is too wet and soft. You tell they are already having trouble with the jack. Still if they do fire the thing; I would be careful being behind it. It's gonna displace like crazy.

I did a stint in FDC due to my GT score. You might have seen pics from it in Playboy magazine. Half the guys in there were worthless, and the other half were lazy. I knew I was being punished fifteen minutes in that dark hole. 12 hours on and 12 hours off; seven days a week. On the otherhand it was clean, and dry (in more than one way). I made the mistake of learning their craft (nothing more than Algebra II in high school), and good map reading. Days were like 48 hours shifts. Right before Tet I let the LT. know what I thought of him and his bunker. He punished me by sending me to gun three at Gator. I was so happy I could have cried. Gun three was special. It was well known as the best 155 gun in the U.S. Military (still holds the hip shoot record by a light year). These guys were that good! All but three had college degrees I might add. They had no section chief, and never needed one. Their main claim to fame was racing other guns in zone sweeps for a case of beer. They never lost, and had a couple hundred cases of beer stashed way when I got there. They taught me how to party real well! Course we were maybe shooting a dozen rounds a day unless it was a sweep. Tet came as a surprise (to me anyway). Jimmy and I were out on an LP that was 250 to 300 yards past the wire. Just covered up and watched. At daylight we headed back, and these guys were still shooting. They ran out of ammo around noon, but ammo was on the way from ten miles north. I spent the next five days out there, before we were told to stay home (thank you). Still better than FDC or changing the inside dual on a five ton. We went from a dozen rounds a night to 250 rounds a night in 48 hours. Out on that LP, I learned how little value a human being has and the REMFs were still eating good. Got off that LP and thought it was just gonna be good from there. After that it just became a big adventure with my First [auto-censored] as the instructor.
gary
27-1025
_VISITCOMMUNITY
North Carolina, United States
Joined: September 16, 2004
KitMaker: 1,273 posts
AeroScale: 39 posts
Posted: Sunday, October 29, 2017 - 08:26 AM UTC
A little experimentation with the NMF barrel. Made up some test barrels and started with three primed gloss black and three with the auto body primer I use.



Next I hit one black and one grey with Tamiya Polished Silver from a rattle can. The one with the grey primer gave a darker hue.



Next I decided to try some of the Mig Metal Acrylics; polished metal and flat aluminum. I thinned these with Mr. Color Leveling Thinner (love that stuff) The flat is not flat at all.





Next I wanted to try to duplicate this lubricant the barrel was reportedly covered in. So I tried some Tamiya Clear colors, orange and yellow. I couldn't find smoke so I may try that later if I still think its important.





And lastly hitting all of them with some flat coat.







For my my taste the plain Mig Polished Metal with Flat Coat looked the best. I have some metalizer smoke may try as a thinned wash/filter to see if I can get an oily sheen.



redleg12
_VISITCOMMUNITY
New Jersey, United States
Joined: March 11, 2007
KitMaker: 872 posts
AeroScale: 22 posts
Posted: Monday, October 30, 2017 - 04:53 AM UTC

Quoted Text

A little experimentation with the NMF barrel. Made up some test barrels and started with three primed gloss black and three with the auto body primer I use.



Next I hit one black and one grey with Tamiya Polished Silver from a rattle can. The one with the grey primer gave a darker hue.



Next I decided to try some of the Mig Metal Acrylics; polished metal and flat aluminum. I thinned these with Mr. Color Leveling Thinner (love that stuff) The flat is not flat at all.





Next I wanted to try to duplicate this lubricant the barrel was reportedly covered in. So I tried some Tamiya Clear colors, orange and yellow. I couldn't find smoke so I may try that later if I still think its important.





And lastly hitting all of them with some flat coat.







For my my taste the plain Mig Polished Metal with Flat Coat looked the best. I have some metalizer smoke may try as a thinned wash/filter to see if I can get an oily sheen.





Using the metallizer smoke as a wash is the way to go. The grease will not really be even from end to end or all oround so brush application would be best.

Rounds Complete!!
sgtreef
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Oklahoma, United States
Joined: March 01, 2002
KitMaker: 6,043 posts
AeroScale: 80 posts
Posted: Monday, October 30, 2017 - 05:12 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Thank God I was a 13F and never a Gun Bunny!



those guys in the WWII photo won't be shooting too much. Ground is too wet and soft. You tell they are already having trouble with the jack. Still if they do fire the thing; I would be careful being behind it. It's gonna displace like crazy.

I did a stint in FDC due to my GT score. You might have seen pics from it in Playboy magazine. Half the guys in there were worthless, and the other half were lazy. I knew I was being punished fifteen minutes in that dark hole. 12 hours on and 12 hours off; seven days a week. On the otherhand it was clean, and dry (in more than one way). I made the mistake of learning their craft (nothing more than Algebra II in high school), and good map reading. Days were like 48 hours shifts. Right before Tet I let the LT. know what I thought of him and his bunker. He punished me by sending me to gun three at Gator. I was so happy I could have cried. Gun three was special. It was well known as the best 155 gun in the U.S. Military (still holds the hip shoot record by a light year). These guys were that good! All but three had college degrees I might add. They had no section chief, and never needed one. Their main claim to fame was racing other guns in zone sweeps for a case of beer. They never lost, and had a couple hundred cases of beer stashed way when I got there. They taught me how to party real well! Course we were maybe shooting a dozen rounds a day unless it was a sweep. Tet came as a surprise (to me anyway). Jimmy and I were out on an LP that was 250 to 300 yards past the wire. Just covered up and watched. At daylight we headed back, and these guys were still shooting. They ran out of ammo around noon, but ammo was on the way from ten miles north. I spent the next five days out there, before we were told to stay home (thank you). Still better than FDC or changing the inside dual on a five ton. We went from a dozen rounds a night to 250 rounds a night in 48 hours. Out on that LP, I learned how little value a human being has and the REMFs were still eating good. Got off that LP and thought it was just gonna be good from there. After that it just became a big adventure with my First [auto-censored] as the instructor.
gary



No reply to the post, but do like reading your posts Gary.
Thanks for that service ,from an ex army combat engineer.
62B20 here.

Jeff
sgtreef
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Oklahoma, United States
Joined: March 01, 2002
KitMaker: 6,043 posts
AeroScale: 80 posts
Posted: Monday, October 30, 2017 - 05:15 AM UTC

Quoted Text

A little experimentation with the NMF barrel. Made up some test barrels and started with three primed gloss black and three with the auto body primer I use.



Next I hit one black and one grey with Tamiya Polished Silver from a rattle can. The one with the grey primer gave a darker hue.



Next I decided to try some of the Mig Metal Acrylics; polished metal and flat aluminum. I thinned these with Mr. Color Leveling Thinner (love that stuff) The flat is not flat at all.





Next I wanted to try to duplicate this lubricant the barrel was reportedly covered in. So I tried some Tamiya Clear colors, orange and yellow. I couldn't find smoke so I may try that later if I still think its important.





And lastly hitting all of them with some flat coat.







For my my taste the plain Mig Polished Metal with Flat Coat looked the best. I have some metalizer smoke may try as a thinned wash/filter to see if I can get an oily sheen.






Try Alcad II paints.
Or stainless steel tube.
Cheers

Jeff
trickymissfit
Joined: October 03, 2007
KitMaker: 1,382 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Monday, October 30, 2017 - 07:14 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Thank God I was a 13F and never a Gun Bunny!



those guys in the WWII photo won't be shooting too much. Ground is too wet and soft. You tell they are already having trouble with the jack. Still if they do fire the thing; I would be careful being behind it. It's gonna displace like crazy.

I did a stint in FDC due to my GT score. You might have seen pics from it in Playboy magazine. Half the guys in there were worthless, and the other half were lazy. I knew I was being punished fifteen minutes in that dark hole. 12 hours on and 12 hours off; seven days a week. On the otherhand it was clean, and dry (in more than one way). I made the mistake of learning their craft (nothing more than Algebra II in high school), and good map reading. Days were like 48 hours shifts. Right before Tet I let the LT. know what I thought of him and his bunker. He punished me by sending me to gun three at Gator. I was so happy I could have cried. Gun three was special. It was well known as the best 155 gun in the U.S. Military (still holds the hip shoot record by a light year). These guys were that good! All but three had college degrees I might add. They had no section chief, and never needed one. Their main claim to fame was racing other guns in zone sweeps for a case of beer. They never lost, and had a couple hundred cases of beer stashed way when I got there. They taught me how to party real well! Course we were maybe shooting a dozen rounds a day unless it was a sweep. Tet came as a surprise (to me anyway). Jimmy and I were out on an LP that was 250 to 300 yards past the wire. Just covered up and watched. At daylight we headed back, and these guys were still shooting. They ran out of ammo around noon, but ammo was on the way from ten miles north. I spent the next five days out there, before we were told to stay home (thank you). Still better than FDC or changing the inside dual on a five ton. We went from a dozen rounds a night to 250 rounds a night in 48 hours. Out on that LP, I learned how little value a human being has and the REMFs were still eating good. Got off that LP and thought it was just gonna be good from there. After that it just became a big adventure with my First [auto-censored] as the instructor.
gary



No reply to the post, but do like reading your posts Gary.
Thanks for that service ,from an ex army combat engineer.
62B20 here.

Jeff



life is just one big adventure, no matter how you look at it. Some day I'll tell you a Combat Engineer's story that will make your hair stand up.
gary
27-1025
_VISITCOMMUNITY
North Carolina, United States
Joined: September 16, 2004
KitMaker: 1,273 posts
AeroScale: 39 posts
Posted: Monday, October 30, 2017 - 07:45 AM UTC

[/quote]
Using the metallizer smoke as a wash is the way to go. The grease will not really be even from end to end or all oround so brush application would be best.

Rounds Complete!![/quote]

Standby. Three new test barrels in progress. High hopes these will look the part and I can apply that same finish to the elevating gears. Pics to follow. The rest of kit fits nicely as well. Got my M114 in the mail today, looking forward to starting it soon; this time in firing mode. Got lots of new pics now to use as a guide. [email protected]
warmonger
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Oklahoma, United States
Joined: November 08, 2006
KitMaker: 215 posts
AeroScale: 80 posts
Posted: Monday, October 30, 2017 - 03:26 PM UTC
Floquil "Old Silver" looks to be a good match to the pics. It's a very strong paint also.
27-1025
_VISITCOMMUNITY
North Carolina, United States
Joined: September 16, 2004
KitMaker: 1,273 posts
AeroScale: 39 posts
Posted: Monday, October 30, 2017 - 07:14 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Floquil "Old Silver" looks to be a good match to the pics. It's a very strong paint also.



Forgot about that one. I probably have a bottle squirreled away here somewhere. Horrible smell but very good paints.
trickymissfit
Joined: October 03, 2007
KitMaker: 1,382 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 - 01:13 AM UTC
keep in mind that the barrel on a 155 howitzer is a very smooth bright metal finish that goes thru a bronze bearing with a Viton seal on the outside of it. If it were rough, it would eat the bearing alive during recoil. Grease was applied for lube and to prevent rust. There is a full 60 inches of recoil when firing a charge seven, but the barrel is maybe a foot longer (or a little more maybe). Upon firing, you will see a ring form that is a dark sooty color at the end of recoil. Of course when shooting a lighter load (say a charge five green bag), the smudge ring with be shorter in distance.

Another thing I noticed in the photos was that somebody painted the inside of the breech!!! They are also bare metal finish (threads and mushroom head as well as the inside of the chamber). Late in life they started issuing hard chromed breeches (they were pre M114's as they were installed with new barrels). All M114's did not have the chromed breech, and it would have came into play in early 68. Finish is a satin looking silver, and really only slightly brighter than the earlier breech parts. The breech would start to get hard to open after 325 rounds, and absolutely had to be cleaned by 350 rounds thru it. You pretty much had to clean the breech everyday.

The scope is never removed once the gun is registered. NEVER! We kept a plastic bag over ours, but that can also create issues with the eye piece steaming up. Everything you touch with your bare hands needs to be covered during the summer months. It gets hot enough to cause blisters.

Someday I'll tell you all about shooting rats
gary