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Armor/AFV: Techniques
From Weathering to making tent rolls, discuss it here.
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filling joints
Biggles2
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Quebec, Canada
Joined: January 01, 2004
KitMaker: 7,600 posts
AeroScale: 121 posts
Posted: Friday, January 22, 2016 - 08:56 PM UTC
Ever have a hair line joint seam, or surgery cut line, that is narrow and shallow? Where Squadron putty won't grip and just crumbles out when you sand; and where epoxy putty is just too stiff and lumpy to work easily? And if you just leave it, it will stand out like a sore thumb, after painting? I use stretched sprue. Glue an appropriately size piece of stretched sprue along the gap, and saturate it with liquid glue - much like doing weld seams. When the stretched sprue is sufficiently saturated it becomes soft and you can squash it down flat and fill the gap. Leave it to set up for a couple of hours, or overnight. The stretched sprue and kit have fused into one. Sand smooth and the hairline gap has disappeared! If color is an issue, you can use sprue from the same kit.
retiredyank
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Arkansas, United States
Joined: June 29, 2009
KitMaker: 11,610 posts
AeroScale: 79 posts
Posted: Friday, January 22, 2016 - 09:04 PM UTC
You can use white glue, as well. Apply it. Wipe off the excess and allow to dry. The only problem is that it is not sandable. Gunze dissolved putty works nearly as well and is sandable.
Drac67
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Alberta, Canada
Joined: December 14, 2013
KitMaker: 35 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Friday, January 22, 2016 - 09:12 PM UTC
Thanks for the idea !

Marc
Biggles2
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Quebec, Canada
Joined: January 01, 2004
KitMaker: 7,600 posts
AeroScale: 121 posts
Posted: Friday, January 22, 2016 - 09:32 PM UTC

Quoted Text

You can use white glue, as well. Apply it. Wipe off the excess and allow to dry. The only problem is that it is not sandable. Gunze dissolved putty works nearly as well and is sandable.



The trouble with most liquid fillers is that they shrink as they dry, and require several layers until the gap is filled.
Armored76
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Bayern, Germany
Joined: September 30, 2013
KitMaker: 1,615 posts
AeroScale: 51 posts
Posted: Friday, January 22, 2016 - 09:47 PM UTC
I'm using mr Surfacer 500 then level it out with nail polish cleaner (the one with acetone).
Headhunter506
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New York, United States
Joined: December 01, 2007
KitMaker: 1,569 posts
AeroScale: 45 posts
Posted: Friday, January 22, 2016 - 11:47 PM UTC
For filling seams, use Magic-Sculpt.It doesn't shrink, can be smoothed with a wet fingertip and is sandable. Now...... filling joints... Panama Red is a good choice

retiredyank
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Arkansas, United States
Joined: June 29, 2009
KitMaker: 11,610 posts
AeroScale: 79 posts
Posted: Friday, January 22, 2016 - 11:57 PM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

You can use white glue, as well. Apply it. Wipe off the excess and allow to dry. The only problem is that it is not sandable. Gunze dissolved putty works nearly as well and is sandable.



The trouble with most liquid fillers is that they shrink as they dry, and require several layers until the gap is filled.



I have yet to encounter shrinking, with dissolved putty.
brekinapez
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Georgia, United States
Joined: July 26, 2013
KitMaker: 2,268 posts
AeroScale: 158 posts
Posted: Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 01:29 AM UTC

Quoted Text

For filling seams, use Magic-Sculpt.It doesn't shrink, can be smoothed with a wet fingertip and is sandable. Now...... filling joints... Panama Red is a good choice




As a New Yorker, wouldn't Sour Diesel be a better choice?
Headhunter506
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New York, United States
Joined: December 01, 2007
KitMaker: 1,569 posts
AeroScale: 45 posts
Posted: Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 01:41 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

For filling seams, use Magic-Sculpt.It doesn't shrink, can be smoothed with a wet fingertip and is sandable. Now...... filling joints... Panama Red is a good choice




As a New Yorker, wouldn't Sour Diesel be a better choice?



It all boils down to personal preferences. I'll meet you at Bryant Park.
brekinapez
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Georgia, United States
Joined: July 26, 2013
KitMaker: 2,268 posts
AeroScale: 158 posts
Posted: Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 01:45 AM UTC
I'm not up to slogging through the mess up there at the moment. I'll just stay down here in Georgia and enjoy the pitiful slush fading away in my front yard.

Maybe some other time.
tatbaqui
Staff MemberNews Reporter
ARMORAMA
#040
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Metro Manila, Philippines
Joined: May 06, 2007
KitMaker: 2,711 posts
AeroScale: 65 posts
Posted: Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 07:04 AM UTC

Quoted Text

For filling seams, use Magic-Sculpt.It doesn't shrink, can be smoothed with a wet fingertip and is sandable. Now...... filling joints... Panama Red is a good choice




Biggles2
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Quebec, Canada
Joined: January 01, 2004
KitMaker: 7,600 posts
AeroScale: 121 posts
Posted: Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 07:57 PM UTC
Washington window-box!
cabasner
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Nevada, United States
Joined: February 12, 2012
KitMaker: 1,076 posts
AeroScale: 21 posts
Posted: Sunday, January 24, 2016 - 08:30 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Ever have a hair line joint seam, or surgery cut line, that is narrow and shallow? Where Squadron putty won't grip and just crumbles out when you sand; and where epoxy putty is just too stiff and lumpy to work easily? And if you just leave it, it will stand out like a sore thumb, after painting? I use stretched sprue. Glue an appropriately size piece of stretched sprue along the gap, and saturate it with liquid glue - much like doing weld seams. When the stretched sprue is sufficiently saturated it becomes soft and you can squash it down flat and fill the gap. Leave it to set up for a couple of hours, or overnight. The stretched sprue and kit have fused into one. Sand smooth and the hairline gap has disappeared! If color is an issue, you can use sprue from the same kit.



I just tried your suggested method for the first time today, and it was GREAT! It really worked well. I still needed to use a bit of glue along the top of the melted sprue, which made a bit more mess than should be the case after a bit more practice, but the concept is wonderful! Thanks for the idea.
Biggles2
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Quebec, Canada
Joined: January 01, 2004
KitMaker: 7,600 posts
AeroScale: 121 posts
Posted: Sunday, January 24, 2016 - 08:49 PM UTC
After applying the piece of stretched sprue you have to brush it with several coats of liquid glue to soften it. I use Tamiya Thin because it has a convenient fine tip applicator brush. You can control the glue and confine it to a smaller area. Some care will be needed not to put glue over adjacent detail areas...but then equal care must be taken with whatever filling method is used. Glad my method worked well for you!
tankmodeler
#417
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Ontario, Canada
Joined: March 01, 2004
KitMaker: 3,123 posts
AeroScale: 1 posts
Posted: Monday, January 25, 2016 - 04:58 AM UTC



My ghod! Big Bambu! I haven't heard that in years. Was funny as hell though when I was a teenager.
mogdude
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United States
Joined: June 18, 2012
KitMaker: 459 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Monday, January 25, 2016 - 05:20 AM UTC

Quoted Text

:[]--


My ghod! Big Bambu! I haven't heard that in years. Was funny as hell though when I was a teenager.



LOL I still have the album and the gigantic rolling paper that goes with it