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Early Aviation
Discuss World War I and the early years of aviation thru 1934.
REVIEW
1/32 Felixstowe 2a Microtextile Sea
tinbanger
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Ontario, Canada
Joined: February 04, 2008
KitMaker: 2,507 posts
AeroScale: 1,814 posts
Posted: Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 02:51 AM UTC
This set is designed for the 1/32 model kit by Wingnut Wings.
It has 25 micro-textile straps and 14 photoetch pieces.
it is made using micro-textile sheeting, metallic buckles.
The straps are Micro-textile strips which are printed and behave like a tight weave fabric.

Link to Item

If you have comments or questions please post them here.

Thanks!
bill_c
Staff MemberCampaigns Administrator
MODEL SHIPWRIGHTS
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New Jersey, United States
Joined: January 09, 2008
KitMaker: 10,553 posts
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Posted: Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 10:06 PM UTC
Very nice products for a mammoth kit!!
Merlin
Staff MemberSenior Editor
AEROSCALE
#017
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United Kingdom
Joined: June 11, 2003
KitMaker: 17,581 posts
AeroScale: 12,794 posts
Posted: Monday, May 04, 2015 - 12:04 AM UTC
Hi there

Great products, but the "micro-textile" bit always makes me giggle slightly as great "marketing-speak" (says he, after a career in the marketing world ) - they are paper (paper is technically a textile). I'm hoping there's a set ready in time before I close up the cockpit on the AEG.

All the best

Rowan
JackFlash
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Colorado, United States
Joined: January 25, 2004
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Posted: Tuesday, May 05, 2015 - 05:36 PM UTC
Actually the term "Microtextile" speaks about the fine rubber-like weave that is attached to the vinyl straps. No paper involved.
Merlin
Staff MemberSenior Editor
AEROSCALE
#017
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United Kingdom
Joined: June 11, 2003
KitMaker: 17,581 posts
AeroScale: 12,794 posts
Posted: Wednesday, May 06, 2015 - 12:33 AM UTC
Hi Stephen

No paper involved? At all? It's all rubber and vinyl?

Maybe we're looking at totally different products. Have they changed? If not, it's amazing, because all the ones I have are water-absorbent. I think that counts out rubber and vinyl?

Believe me, that's not a criticism - it's a really handy characteristic, because it means you can soak off the annoying backing paper that has red lines on it. It's also a really good way to avoid the belts creasing when you mould them to shape.

I'm sorry, the ones I have will remain "paper" belts in my mind - and I love them.

All the best

Rowan
Merlin
Staff MemberSenior Editor
AEROSCALE
#017
_VISITCOMMUNITY
United Kingdom
Joined: June 11, 2003
KitMaker: 17,581 posts
AeroScale: 12,794 posts
Posted: Wednesday, May 06, 2015 - 10:58 PM UTC
Hi again Stephen

What a prize plonker I am! I've just been playing with a set for another build and realised that the backing paper which I've always laboriously soaked away, is in fact intended to peel off leaving, just as you say... a fabric belt! It's been worth looking daft to find out how to use them properly - I love them even more now!

All the best

Rowan
CaptnTommy
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Connecticut, United States
Joined: October 26, 2009
KitMaker: 424 posts
AeroScale: 389 posts
Posted: Thursday, May 07, 2015 - 01:07 AM UTC
Plonker???? I believe I once did that inflight inverted at twenty feet. Or was it twenty thousand? Any way I survived with a good Story.

Irregardless I Do use paper. and paint.

Enjoy
Captn Tommy
Merlin
Staff MemberSenior Editor
AEROSCALE
#017
_VISITCOMMUNITY
United Kingdom
Joined: June 11, 2003
KitMaker: 17,581 posts
AeroScale: 12,794 posts
Posted: Thursday, May 07, 2015 - 01:31 AM UTC
Cheers Tom

I'm now looking at the backing paper as a free set of paper belts.

All the best

Rowan