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Tools & Supplies: Glue and Adhesives
Talk about sticky stuff.
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Best Plastic Cement
retiredyank
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Arkansas, United States
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Posted: Saturday, May 17, 2014 - 08:30 PM UTC
I know I have read a couple of threads on this subject. MEK seems to be a popular alternate plastic cement. Problem: I did not have any MEK. Solution: lacquer thinner. I brush it on out of an old Tamiya cement bottle. It cures almost instantly and can be removed by reapplication.
radish1us
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Queensland, Australia
Joined: June 29, 2010
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Posted: Saturday, May 17, 2014 - 09:21 PM UTC
GLUEING A MODEL TOGETHER

Here are a few tips on how I glue a model together, these might not go astray for any beginners and it will point them in a direction that can be tried out and if acceptable, used.


The glue that I use the most on any model is TESTOR'S SPECIAL FORMULA PLASTIC CEMENT which contains METHYL ISO-BUTYL KETONE (M.I.K.).This glue is a clear liquid,in a square bottle, with a screw on lid which has a brush fitted into the lid.
The reason this stuff is used the most, is that it is a part of the
property of polystyrene when it is being moulded into the parts for a kit model. This M.I.K. is turned into a vapour during the hot pressurised moulding process. All you are doing, is replacing part of the original make-up of the plastic, when using this glue.
When you use Testor's, you paint a thin layer onto one surface and do the same to the other piece, you are actually melting the surfaces of the plastic, press them together and hold for approx 30sec, applying a firm pressure to the parts being glued, put the parts to one side and leave alone for a few minutes. Make sure it is not “painted styrene”, you must scrape any paint of, or it will form a barrier between the two bits of styrene.
What you now have is one piece of plastic instead of two.

One form of glue that I DO NOT USE AT ALL, is the type of glue that comes in a tube that is supposed to be for plastic models. You will have seen this type of gunk many times, Revell,Testor's and many more brands of this gunk are available on the market. The problem with this gunk is that it DOES NOT WELD the parts together, but it only fills in the gaps around the parts, just like mortar between bricks.
You see a lot of ‘learners’ using this crud, as nobody has told them any different, this rubbish can even be used on painted bits, it doesn’t even eat into the paint, no wonder bits then start to fall of the model.
After a while, this type of gunk releases its pressure on the bits
glued together and they just fall off the model, very frustrating and annoying when it happens.

The next type of glue I use is very similar to M.I.K, it is very close to it. This is 100% METHYL ETHEL KETONE. This stuff is available from your local hardware store. This is a very strong version of M.I.K., so if you use it, be warned and be careful, as it will melt the parts if you put on too much.
If you want to get this stuff, go to the local hardware and ask for Bostick Priming Fluid for PVC Pipe Fittings, make sure that it is a clear fluid in the container. This is used when scratch building parts and is applied sparingly onto the polystyrene sheeting and then put into a clamp to apply an even pressure onto the pieces, when it has dried out, you now have one solid piece that will never come apart, you will have to cut it of, you can even file, drill, sand or scrape it, as it’s now one solid piece of styrene. .

You can use paint thinners if your desperate, it will appear to stick the two bits together, BUT, it will not weld them together, if you want to use this stuff, then go for it.
Remember a bit of a bump after a while and bits will start to fall of the model, your choice on using that one.

Acetone is another liquid that you can use on styrene, if applied sparingly, it will melt into the styrene and then when clamped together, will dry out to form one solid bit of styrene.
The only thing to watch out for, is DO NOT lay the liquid on too thick, or it WILL eat away at the styrene and destroy it.

The use of good old wood glue, AQUADHERE (brand name) or any PVA craft glue cannot be bypassed. This stuff is the only type of glue that should be used when fitting in clear polystyrene parts to the model. Use anything else and you will definitely be able to see that you did not use a P.V.A glue. All other glues will scar or blemish the clear parts, makes them go all foggy, so please do not use anything other than a PVA glue on any clear plastic bits.
PVA glues are a water based glue, so they will not damage any plastic parts at all, they are easy to clean up as well, just use a cotton bud dipped in water and roll it over any extra glue you might have put on.
Remember though that this type of glue is only like the mortar between bricks, it will not melt the plastic together at all, it only holds the pieces together by suction. You can also use PVA to fill in any small holes, cracks, gaps or blemishes on your model before you paint the model, just remember that you have used it and don't decide to wash the model in water to get rid of dust or other junk, or you are going to have a lot of filling to do again.


The last type of glue used is called ALPHA CYANOACRYLATE CEMENT(ACC's) which are "liquid acrylate monomers that readily undergo anionic polymerisation to form very strong bonds between two surfaces".

In other words, good ole' SUPER GLUE.

This stuff is good for lots of jobs on a model, but remember that it will stick your fingers together and anything else you can think of or touch. There are a lot of different types of this stuff available, some of it is like water and will run everywhere and over everything.
Another type is as thick as clay, with lots of varieties in between. If you want to know more about the different varieties of this stuff, go along to a Bearing Specialist (Yellow Pages) and have a chat to the body behind the counter. They use Super Glue to fix up flogged out bearings, different types are used to fix up different problems, so go see them, get the right body behind the counter and you'll have a goldmine of information on tap.

DO NOT USE SUPER GLUE ANYWHERE NEAR CLEAR PLASTIC OR YOU WILL HAVE A FOGGY MESS LOOKING AT YOU.
BE VERY CAREFUL NEAR FINISHED PAINTED SURFACES, AS IT CAN EAT THE PAINT FROM THE FINISHED MODEL AND WILL LEAVE A BLOOM AROUND THE AREA THAT IT HAS BEEN USED ON. KEEP IT AWAY FROM THE KIDS AS WELL( unless you want to get even with your younger siblings).
JUST REMEMBER THAT IT IS TOXIC, TRY NOT BREATH THE FUMES AND IF YOU GET STUCK TOGETHER, DON'T PANIC OR YOU WILL JUST TEAR YOUR SKIN OFF.
USE ACETATE ( Fingernail Polish Remover) AND JUST WAIT FOR IT TO DISSOLVE OR WEAKEN THE GRIP OF THE SUPER GLUE.
retiredyank
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Arkansas, United States
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Posted: Saturday, May 17, 2014 - 10:03 PM UTC
Lacquer thinner is quite a bit cheaper than hobby glues. MEK does not work as well as lacquer thinner. For super glue, I use BSI products.
Namerifrats
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North Carolina, United States
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Posted: Thursday, May 29, 2014 - 11:41 AM UTC
How about the regular Testors cement, black square bottle with red label?
SgtRam
Staff MemberEditor-at-Large
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#197
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Ontario, Canada
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Posted: Thursday, May 29, 2014 - 12:10 PM UTC
I use Tamiya Ultra Thin and Deluxe Roket Plastic Glue.
retiredyank
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Arkansas, United States
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Posted: Thursday, May 29, 2014 - 03:00 PM UTC

Quoted Text

How about the regular Testors cement, black square bottle with red label?



It bonds in a very similar fashion as Tamiya plastic cement(very strong bond). What I don't like is the absence of an applicator.
TEJones
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South Africa
Joined: June 25, 2012
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Posted: Saturday, August 09, 2014 - 06:08 PM UTC
I second and third the suggestion of MEK. That and for a second choice I will look at mek. Have been using it for about 13-15 years.
Merlin
Staff MemberSenior Editor
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#017
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United Kingdom
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Posted: Sunday, August 10, 2014 - 04:13 AM UTC
Hi Terrance

Probably not the most helpful of answers, but I find there isn't a "one size fits all" solution. Depending on the type of styrene and the job in hand, I keep a variety of "hot" and "mild" plastic cements ready - they all have their uses.

All the best

Rowan
chumpo
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United States
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Posted: Thursday, August 14, 2014 - 01:52 AM UTC
Try it if you like keep it if not try something else .