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General Aircraft: Tips & Techniques
Discussions on specific A/C building techniques.
Humbrol Enamel Paints
skyhunter66
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England - North East, United Kingdom
Joined: April 18, 2012
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Posted: Thursday, March 14, 2013 - 03:47 AM UTC
So I have been using Humbrol Enamel Paints for the first time since I was a teenager and despite my nervousness it has so far gone rather well! Generally I have left 48 hours between coats but now I am ready to do the camo on the top side of my RAF Phantom. I wondered if white tac would be ok to use to mask it and whether I should seal the first colour (medium sea grey) before I airbrush the green to make the disruptive pattern?

I normally use Tamiya paints and have no issue using blue or white tack to mask for camo with them but I am not so sure about the enamels. Part of me thinks I should perhaps use some Klear before I apply the white tac.

Any thoughts??

Thanks
Chris
drabslab
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Posted: Thursday, March 14, 2013 - 03:54 AM UTC
Hai,

I have been using humbrol enamel for camouflage for a long time, never had any issue with it. I use tamiya tape for masking, not white or blue tac.

I've never laid down a layer of klear before putting on "the next colour"; I would (gutt feeling) even recommend aganist it because the klear may lead to a lower adhesive strength of your paint compared to airbrushing the new layer directly on another layer of enamel.

I woudl also wait longer to put on a new coat.48 hours is theoretically more than enough but I wait usually for a week before maskign and putting an extra coat on.
skyhunter66
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England - North East, United Kingdom
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Posted: Thursday, March 14, 2013 - 04:04 AM UTC
Hi - thanks for that. I use Tamiya tape but haven't tried it for RAF style camo - not sure how you bend it to get the right look?
Antoni
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England - East Midlands, United Kingdom
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Posted: Thursday, March 14, 2013 - 06:51 AM UTC
You should not see any difference in using white tac on enamel paints. I do it all the time. The only problem with white or blue tac is that they contain vegetable oil as a plasticiser and this can leave a faint stain on the surface. In this respect, white has a reputation of being the better.

If you want outline the camouflage pattern with masking tape you need to use narrow widths. Aizu Micron is very similar to Tamiya tape and comes in widths from .5 mm to 2.5 mm. It is designed to be laid in curve shapes. Unfortunately it is difficult to get hold of. Hobbylink Japan is one source or here. http://www.jadarhobby.pl/advanced_search_result.php?search_in_description=1&inc_subcat=1&keywords=aizu&pfrom=&pto=&x=27&y=9

Looks like they are running out!

Jammy dog tape is more like conventional masking tape and is very good, I use it when I cannot get the Aizu.

http://www.jammydog.com/micro_masking_tape.htm
drabslab
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Posted: Thursday, March 14, 2013 - 10:00 AM UTC

Quoted Text

You should not see any difference in using white tac on enamel paints. I do it all the time. The only problem with white or blue tac is that they contain vegetable oil as a plasticiser and this can leave a faint stain on the surface. In this respect, white has a reputation of being the better.

If you want outline the camouflage pattern with masking tape you need to use narrow widths. Aizu Micron is very similar to Tamiya tape and comes in widths from .5 mm to 2.5 mm. It is designed to be laid in curve shapes. Unfortunately it is difficult to get hold of. Hobbylink Japan is one source or here. http://www.jadarhobby.pl/advanced_search_result.php?search_in_description=1&inc_subcat=1&keywords=aizu&pfrom=&pto=&x=27&y=9

Looks like they are running out!

Jammy dog tape is more like conventional masking tape and is very good, I use it when I cannot get the Aizu.

http://www.jammydog.com/micro_masking_tape.htm


I put a lieve of tamiya tape on a fitting mat and cut IT in stripes of two mm, world perfect for me, also for canopies
skyhunter66
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England - North East, United Kingdom
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Posted: Thursday, March 14, 2013 - 08:28 PM UTC
ok thanks gents - I will use white tack on this one and order some of that tape in I think - or perhaps have a bash at cutting Tamiya tape in to thin strips first. I want to get it right as I have a Jaguar and a Lightning I intend to do in the disruptive scheme!
drabslab
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Posted: Thursday, March 14, 2013 - 09:03 PM UTC

Quoted Text

ok thanks gents - I will use white tack on this one and order some of that tape in I think - or perhaps have a bash at cutting Tamiya tape in to thin strips first. I want to get it right as I have a Jaguar and a Lightning I intend to do in the disruptive scheme!



It depends a bit whether you want sharp edges between color or not. Tamiya tape is best fro sharp edges, tac is better when you want a soft edge.
Mcleod
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Alberta, Canada
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Posted: Friday, March 15, 2013 - 02:32 AM UTC
Hi. I'm not trying to hyjack this thread, but, since the discussion is Humbrol enamels, I thought I should like to ask a couple of questions.

When airbrushing Humbrol, do you just use paint thinner as the thinning medium?
Also, is it more involved to clean up the brush when using enamels compared with acrylics?

I've never airbrushed enamel. On one project, I will soon have to.
J8kob_F
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Stockholm, Sweden
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Posted: Friday, March 15, 2013 - 04:06 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Hi. I'm not trying to hyjack this thread, but, since the discussion is Humbrol enamels, I thought I should like to ask a couple of questions.

When airbrushing Humbrol, do you just use paint thinner as the thinning medium?
Also, is it more involved to clean up the brush when using enamels compared with acrylics?

I've never airbrushed enamel. On one project, I will soon have to.



Until about a year ago i exclusively used Humbrol enamels and just recently started using Tamiya instead. In terms of thinning i would use Humbrols own thinner, Iíve tried a couple others and found that i didn't get the result i wanted it never properly dries up and such.

Concerning clean up i would say that acrylics and enamels are about the same. The only difference is that the cleaning fluids for cleaning enamels are a lot smellier since more aggressive solvents are needed. That is primarily why i started using Tamiya acrylics because u can use water to get the majority of the paint of the airbrush and use thinners only for "detail cleaning". For enamels u must use thinner all the way thru.

Good luck

Jakob
Antoni
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England - East Midlands, United Kingdom
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Posted: Friday, March 15, 2013 - 08:25 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Until about a year ago i exclusively used Humbrol enamels and just recently started using Tamiya instead. In terms of thinning i would use Humbrols own thinner, Iíve tried a couple others and found that i didn't get the result i wanted it never properly dries up and such.



Jakob



The basis of Humbrol thinners is naphtha, the lightest and consequently most volatile component of the distillation of petroleum spirit. From the smell, I would guess that it also contains terebenes. Enamel or oil paints are made with drying oils, usually linseed, others include tung, soya, saff, poppyseed. Bit of a misnomer as drying oils do not dry, they harden through a complex of chemical reactions and polymerizations that involve oxidation. The drying properties can be improved by boiling the oil with metallic salts which is why you will find both linseed and boiled linseed oil on the shelves of artist suppliers. Terebenes promote the hardening of drying oils and have long been used by painters and decorators to add to old paint or paint that has been stored for a long period as they have tendency to remain tacky, not drying/hardening properly. A concentrated solution, coloured a deep purple, can be obtained from the places where professional painters and decorators obtain their supplies. Rustins Paint Driers are a well known brand.

http://www.rustins.eu/Details.asp?ProductID=777

Failing that Terebenes are also used by artists who call it siccative. Available from artists suppliers, it is the same purple stuff but more expensive.
skyhunter66
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England - North East, United Kingdom
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Posted: Sunday, March 17, 2013 - 10:28 PM UTC
Hi - these were the questions I had a couple of weeks ago so I know where you are coming from!

Ok so what has worked for me is stir the pain in the tin like mad for 4 mins and then pour the whole tin in to a mixing jar. I think add about 40% Humbrol Enamel Thinner and mix with a paint brush. I use what I need in the airbrush and then decant the rest back in to the tin to use another day.

I spray at a constant 15 psi which seems fine and then clean it through afterwards with regular white spirit. I don't find it any more difficult than cleaning out acrylics. However it is a bit toxic in terms of the smell so wear a mask!

So I reckon a good 2 - 3 days for the paint to cure before masking.

I am learning myself but this is what I have discovered so far

Chris