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Revell Olympia build
TimReynaga
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
MODEL SHIPWRIGHTS
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California, United States
Joined: May 03, 2006
KitMaker: 2,268 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, December 04, 2013 - 01:19 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Hi Tim,

First of all, congratulations on your excellent model! It is indeed a piece worthy of displaying in a museum. I am so glad I came across your thread where you unselfishly shared your skill and knowledge. I am working on my USS Olympia and I have been reading and re-reading this wonderful thread of yours. The ship masts that came with my kit is horribly skewed. I would like to replace it with brass tubes the way you did yours. My question is, how did you drill the hole to support the mast? This will be my first attempt at working with brass tubes and have zero knowledge on how to go about it. Thanks very much in advance!

Joseph


Thank you Joseph, for your kind words!

Not precisely sure what you mean by "drill the hole to support the mast" - I assume you are referring to the holes in the masts into which the angled gaffs were fitted? If so... I made each of these by first lightly notching the brass mast tube with the corner of a jeweler’s file, then using the notch as a guide for a very small drill bit mounted in my X-Acto knife handle. I slowly hand turned the bit until a small hole punched through, then switched to a slightly larger bit until I could fit the gaff into the mast. Then I secured the gaff in place with cyanoacrylate. It was very fiddly, difficult procedure and I had to do it for both gaffs, but I couldn't think of a better way to get them to attach to the masts with sufficient strength.

Maybe if I were to do it again I would solder them in place!

BravoTwoZero
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California, United States
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Posted: Thursday, December 05, 2013 - 05:00 AM UTC
Hi Tim,

That's exactly what I was referring to. Thanks for the tip, I will give that a try. Also thank you for providing even the brand, measurements/specifications for the tubes that you used. It made it very easy to look these online. I have ordered them and I will give your method a try. Again, I will reiterate that I am very much impressed with your build log and its corresponding results. It is very well thought out and very helpful for us (especially me) who is building the same model.

Joseph
Mgunns
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Arizona, United States
Joined: December 12, 2008
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Posted: Friday, January 10, 2014 - 05:21 AM UTC
Hello Tim:

I am just catching up on this build. Outstanding workmanship and an outstanding model. Very inspiring work.

Best

Mark
Aurora-7
#360
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Connecticut, United States
Joined: June 18, 2003
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Posted: Monday, January 13, 2014 - 06:02 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Hello Tim:

I am just catching up on this build. Outstanding workmanship and an outstanding model. Very inspiring work.

Best

Mark



Ditto. It got me to get an Encore kit of her. Plus while at an antique shop during the time between Christmas and New Years, my wife and I came across a 1899 print of the Naval fleet in Manila Bay during the Spanish American War -with Olympia right in the foreground.

Between this thread and that discovery (which we also bought) I just had to get the kit.

Really inspirational work you did with her.

Plus I cam across this article from last October on a plan to save the real Olympia form further decay:

http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20131006_A_plan_to_save_the_USS_Olympia.html

TimReynaga
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
MODEL SHIPWRIGHTS
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California, United States
Joined: May 03, 2006
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Posted: Tuesday, January 14, 2014 - 03:46 AM UTC
Mark and Michael, very kind of you both, and I really appreciate your comments!

It is a shame that this unique and historic vessel has been allowed to deteriorate so badly, but it is also encouraging that a solution may be on the horizon. Still, not everyone is so sanguine about her prospects. I saw this cartoon in the U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings Magazine - July 2010 Vol. 136/7/1,289:



And this one, from the To the Sound of the Guns blog posted 24 May 2011:


Let’s hope Philly, or perhaps California (she was built here!) can put together a viable plan to save her!

s4usea
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United States
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Posted: Tuesday, January 14, 2014 - 05:52 AM UTC
I am so sorry about what's going on. My father was SOPA in Philly and he held events on her while his ship was in the yards. I've followed the story, done what I could, but I think is this is what killed her: http://articles.philly.com/2007-11-03/news/25224799_1_sentencing-guidelines-white-collar-crimes-corey-kemp After this, the locals lost faith...
PROUDDAD
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United States
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Posted: Friday, May 09, 2014 - 04:21 AM UTC
Tim,
I'm so proud of you! I've appreciated your skills since you were a little boy. The exquisite detail you put into your models is incredible. Judging from the comments from other modelers, your abilities are a testament to your extraordinary craftsmanship.
Your father,
Gil Reynaga
burbankbill
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Illinois, United States
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Posted: Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 04:48 AM UTC
Very nice work.

Bill
CPORet
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West Virginia, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, August 06, 2014 - 09:31 AM UTC
Hello all,

Hopefully, this thread is still being viewed, as I have
something for all of you. If you intend to build the
USS Olympia kit (like I do), then this may help you.
Here is a link to a slideshow of the photos that I took
on my recent trip to see the USS Olympia in Philadlephia:

http://s754.photobucket.com/user/MattAltieri/slideshow/USS%20Olympia

There are some obvious differences between the kit and how
she looks now. One thing to note is in the photos you'll
see a grey deck. The original wood deck either rotted or
was purposely replaced at some point. The only wood deck
is on the bridge.

Also, the main deck was off limits, so I couldn't get close
up photos of the turrets and anchors.

Aside from a research angle, I highly suggest visiting the
ship. If you do go, try to go on the 1st Saturday of the
month. That's when for a couple of extra bucks you can
see the engine room (normally off limits). I forgot to ask,
but I would have loved to have seen the torpedo room(s).

It's still pretty fresh in my mind, so if you have any
questions, please ask. Also, all of these photos are in
3D. I can get them to you in the red/green 3D style, but
you'll need 3D glasses to view.

Tim - fantastic job on your build. Seeing yours has inspired
me to build one myself. However, I have one nit to pick:
Commissioning pennants are swallow tailed.
TimReynaga
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
MODEL SHIPWRIGHTS
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California, United States
Joined: May 03, 2006
KitMaker: 2,268 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, August 06, 2014 - 01:00 PM UTC
Hey Matthew,

Thank you for those great photos - I wish I had them when I was doing the build! As for the commissioning pennant, you are perfectly right, it should have been swallow tailed. Doh!

Interestingly, there seem to have been some exceptions to this rule in the late 1800s, though. Check out this one I found online at the Antiques Council (an international organization of antiques dealers):


Go figure.

Anyway, thanks again, and I wish you the very best on your own Olympia build!

regards,
Tim
Aurora-7
#360
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Connecticut, United States
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Posted: Thursday, August 07, 2014 - 12:26 AM UTC
Thanks for posting the images, CPORet.

Especially thanks for the first-Saturday-of-the-month tip!

Was there any news when you were there about Olympia's future?
CPORet
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West Virginia, United States
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Posted: Thursday, August 07, 2014 - 03:24 AM UTC
Thanks Tim. I thought about it and figured there had to be some variance with pennants & such over the years. My recollection is from my time in the Coast Guard. The modern ones are swallow tails, but it's quite possible that the Olympia could have had one that wasn't. Naval tradition is kind of funny, it's often hit or miss. Often, the direction of the service (USN & USCG) change when a new Commandant or CNO is in charge.
CPORet
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West Virginia, United States
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Posted: Thursday, August 07, 2014 - 03:32 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Thanks for posting the images, CPORet.

Especially thanks for the first-Saturday-of-the-month tip!

Was there any news when you were there about Olympia's future?



There wasn't anything visible or mentioned about her future there at the museum. They are always looking for donations/funds, but that's true for every maritime museum.
Last I heard, the Olympia will be staying there in Philadelphia. You don't notice it on the tour, but she really does need some serious maintenance.

I wish they could show her with one or two of the small boats onboard, as that would give you a greater idea of what it was like back in her heyday.

Something else - from the Seaport you can catch a ferry over to Camden NJ, where you can tour the USS New Jersey. Or you can drive over there - about 15 mins away. Since I was
traveling, I did both. Interesting to see 1983 vs 1943 technology.
CPORet
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West Virginia, United States
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Posted: Thursday, August 07, 2014 - 03:47 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Hey Matthew,

Thank you for those great photos - I wish I had them when I was doing the build! As for the commissioning pennant, you are perfectly right, it should have been swallow tailed. Doh!

Interestingly, there seem to have been some exceptions to this rule in the late 1800s, though. Check out this one I found online at the Antiques Council (an international organization of antiques dealers):

 photo commissioningpennant_zpsc205ac3a.jpg
Go figure.

Anyway, thanks again, and I wish you the very best on your own Olympia build!

regards,
Tim



Here is a modern Commissioning Pennant. This one flew onboard a ship I was stationed on in Alaska. It looks small, but it's actually close to 4' long.
Proinsias
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England - East Anglia, United Kingdom
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Posted: Sunday, December 04, 2016 - 08:43 PM UTC
Wow... too good !!!

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