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Early Aviation
Discuss World War I and the early years of aviation thru 1934.
REVIEW
Austro-Hung. Army a/c of WWI
JackFlash
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Colorado, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, August 11, 2010 - 01:36 AM UTC

At 544 pages "Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One" (2nd issue) is the most comprehensive, detailed and accurate history of these exotic aircraft ever written. Based on more than 20 years of research by Peter M Grosz, George Haddow and Peter Schiemer. The publisher "Flying Machines Press" is a subsidiary of "Paladin Press". Its a fine reference to all subjects related to this title.

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If you have comments or questions please post them here.

Thanks!
thegirl
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Alberta, Canada
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Posted: Wednesday, August 11, 2010 - 02:40 AM UTC
Thanks for the review Stephen . A must for any Austro - Hungarian fan .

Does it also cover the Naval aircraft used ?
JackFlash
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Colorado, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, August 11, 2010 - 02:51 AM UTC

Quoted Text

". . .Does it also cover the Naval aircraft used ?"



Yes, every manufacturer is covered.
JackFlash
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Colorado, United States
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Posted: Monday, August 16, 2010 - 05:30 AM UTC
Here is more on the first pressing of this book from Mr. Kirk R. Lowry of Toronto Canada.


Quoted Text

Bonjour. . .

You are correct: the majority of the information found in the section of the 1st edition of Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One, entitled Color and Camouflage in the Austro-Hungarian Army Air which was compiled by Marty O'Connor remains accurate about the subject of markings and colours of the aircraft of the dual monarchy.

Analysis of Aviatik (Berg) D.I 101.37 during restoration revealed that what appeared to be tan and green had actually been two shades of grey which had deteriorated over time, presumably, due to the application of varnish on the original colours. O'Connor had been led astray by Rodney Gerrard who had produced what was purported to be an original sample of Austro-Hungarian produced fabric (discussion of the subject by Gregory Alegi may be found in Cross & Cockade International Journal, Vol.27 No.1 and Windsock International Vol.12. No.5). Thus, the schemes presented in the book under the names Serrated Bands, Wavy Bands or Georgraphic are now considered to be shown in erroneous colours.

The upshot is that the following aircraft are depicted Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One in what are known to be incorrect shades: 28. Brandenburg C.I(U) 369.127, Flik 59/D, 29. Brandenburg C.I(U) 369.158, 36. Aviatik D.I(MAG) 92.89, 37. Aviatik D.I 338.38, 47. Phönix C.I 121.57, 48. Aviatik 30.40, 51. Phönix D.III 222.126, 54. UFAG C.I 161.92, Flik 66/K, 55. UFAG C.I 161.138. Thus, of the 56 aircraft depicted in colour in the book only 9 are depicted incorrectly and at that only in tone and not in pattern. I would much prefer a copy of the volume with the beautiful and, for the most part, accurate artwork included!

Salut!
Kirk

nosewrit
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New York, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, August 18, 2010 - 12:44 AM UTC
You mention that "all of the colour profiles and notes have been deleted. This is inline with Pete Grosz' general lifelong attitude .."

What was his criticism of profiles? I know there are always the questions of accuracy, but for many modelers who don't have the time or resources to do original research, they fill a valuable niche.
JackFlash
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Colorado, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, August 18, 2010 - 07:25 AM UTC
Greetings Matthew,

Pete Grosz was more interested in the technical aspects than the colours. His many letters to me and his attitude in general always reflected a lack of interest in colour profiles. The notations in the text specifically refer back to bad iformation that came to Dr. O'Connor through the discredited Mr. Gerrard.

Rather than try to fix it he recommended any future reissues of the book be without the artwork. The publisher in this case bowed to his request.