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Aircraft Trivia Quiz 2 (Join In)
Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
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Posted: Sunday, February 02, 2020 - 04:09 PM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Ok, this should be relatively easy....

The Antonov AN-22 a very large prop driven plane. However, it's prop blades are eclipsed in size by what aircraft?



Hmmm...I'll give it a shot-- but I think more definition is needed. The Link-Hoffman III failed German WWI bomber had a 22ft+ diameter propeller. But I think the largest propeller ever is the V22 Osprey's 38ft diameter "prop-rotor"--does that count?
VR, Russ



Thanks Gary, I was expecting a longer break. Here in the States, when we play (American) football, the defensive players always like it when the offensive line plays longer, that means the defensive players get a longer break to rest (can you tell I just finished watching the Kansas City Chiefs play the San Francisco 49ers?). But now, I guess I’m off the bench and back into the line. I have a question in mind, but need to do a little more research to make sure I’ve got my facts right. I’ll post tomorrow.
VR, Russ
gastec
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Auckland, New Zealand
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Posted: Sunday, February 02, 2020 - 02:36 PM UTC
The WW1 plane is what I had in mind Russ..

https://aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/35038/what-are-some-of-the-largest-propellers-post-wwii

Back to you....
Kevlar06
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Posted: Sunday, February 02, 2020 - 10:39 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Ok, this should be relatively easy....

The Antonov AN-22 a very large prop driven plane. However, it's prop blades are eclipsed in size by what aircraft?



Hmmm...I'll give it a shot-- but I think more definition is needed. The Link-Hoffman III failed German WWI bomber had a 22ft+ diameter propeller. But I think the largest propeller ever is the V22 Osprey's 38ft diameter "prop-rotor"--does that count?
VR, Russ
gastec
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Auckland, New Zealand
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Posted: Sunday, February 02, 2020 - 08:50 AM UTC
Ok, this should be relatively easy....

The Antonov AN-22 a very large prop driven plane. However, it's prop blades are eclipsed in size by what aircraft?
ReluctantRenegade
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Wien, Austria
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Posted: Friday, January 31, 2020 - 05:21 AM UTC

Quoted Text

CL-44?



Indeed, it was the Canadair CL-44!



The floor is yours, Gary!
2002hummer
#257
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Ontario, Canada
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Posted: Friday, January 31, 2020 - 05:12 AM UTC
Is it the Canadair CL44
gastec
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Auckland, New Zealand
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Posted: Friday, January 31, 2020 - 05:01 AM UTC
CL-44?
ReluctantRenegade
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Posted: Friday, January 31, 2020 - 04:33 AM UTC

Quoted Text

would it be the Douglas DC-6a?



No, but you're in the right direction...
squid56
#502
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Posted: Friday, January 31, 2020 - 03:59 AM UTC
probaly should have READ the question. would it be the Douglas DC-6a? or are we taking something older?
ReluctantRenegade
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Posted: Friday, January 31, 2020 - 03:47 AM UTC
Nope. By tail-swing design I mean the whole empennage.
squid56
#502
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Posted: Friday, January 31, 2020 - 03:28 AM UTC
would it be the gotha 242/244?
ReluctantRenegade
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Posted: Thursday, January 30, 2020 - 10:56 PM UTC
Which cargo plane was the first to introduce a swing-tail design for easier loading?

Kevlar06
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Posted: Wednesday, January 29, 2020 - 07:53 AM UTC
Israel, you’ve got it! Over to you my friend! But before we go, here’s some interesting facts on the XFY-1 Pogo:

1) Based on research conducted by the Germans in developing a point defense VTOL fighter, namely the Focke-Wulf Triebflugel ram-jet wing point defense fighter concept, Convair and the US Navy developed the Pogo as a fighter capable of operating from small ship platforms without requiring an aircraft carrier.
2) The first flights by LTC “Skeets” Coleman were made in a airship hanger, tethered and assisted by a second pilot manning a winch.
3) On November 2 1954, Coleman made the first ever transition of a fixed wing aircraft from vertical to horizontal flight, while in flight. He would make several more flights to follow up.
4) The Pogo was powered by two Allison T-38 turboprop engines, combined with a massive gear box to operate two 14ft contra-rotating propellers. This was called the Allison YT-40. If you look closely, The Pogo has two separate exhausts for each T-38, there is no other outward indication of two operating engines.
5) Besides it’s unconventional landing gear and powerplant , it has a pilots seat on gimbals to allow it to be flown in both vertical and horizontal attitudes, and with a 52 degree Delta wing, it was the only Delta-winged propeller driven aircraft of its day, and became part of the Convair “Delta family“ (XF92, Sea-Dart, F-102, F-106, B58 and Pogo).
6) The pilot had about 25 feet of rope in the cockpit to climb in and out if the Pogo had to land away from support facilities. It was fast too— exceeding 300 mph.
7) The Pogo’s legacy lives on in aircraft like the AV8 Harrier, V22 Osprey, and now the F35, which operate on a similar VTOL/STOL concept. (There were others too, like the Hiller X-18). But the Pogo was first to accomplish what the Germans only dreamed of.

Here’s the story from the Smithsonian:

https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/convair-xfy-1-pogo

Over to you.
VR, Russ
ReluctantRenegade
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Posted: Wednesday, January 29, 2020 - 06:53 AM UTC
The Convair XFY Pogo?

Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, January 29, 2020 - 05:27 AM UTC
Nope, not a hovercraft or ground effect craft. This is an aircraft, which actually flew, has several “operational concept ancestors” existing today (though not of the same design or manufacture), with two of these “ancestors“ actually been used in combat operations, and are still actively serving.

Time for two more clues: 1) The aircraft in question was cancelled in favor of more “conventional” jet aircraft, and partly due to handling characteristics and pilot training requirements. 2) Look at the original posting again—especially the “designed to support naval operations WITHOUT an aircraft carrier”. What type of aircraft can do that today?

VR, Russ
Heatnzl
#435
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Nelson, New Zealand
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Posted: Tuesday, January 28, 2020 - 09:35 PM UTC
I have a feeling it may be some sort of hovercraft, or something that uses "Ground Effect" enabling high speed at very low level.

Cheers

Karl.
Kevlar06
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Posted: Tuesday, January 28, 2020 - 09:28 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Wild, wild guess - some form of jetpack?



Nope, no “Rocketeers” here. This is an aircraft, piloted, that actually flew, originating in Axis ideas, with a few contemporary (for the time) features (and a few not so contemporary features). The concept technology was fleeting though, and wouldn’t be seen again for nearly 30 years in a different form, but even that concept was preceded by another form in a different country altogether.

I’m sensing we’re hung up here on one or two points— 1) Axis (as in German), and; 2) power-plant. Both points are not widely known about this unusual aircraft. What the Germans couldn’t do, this aircraft actually did.
VR, Russ
gastec
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Posted: Tuesday, January 28, 2020 - 08:28 AM UTC
Wild, wild guess - some form of jetpack?
Kevlar06
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Posted: Tuesday, January 28, 2020 - 07:04 AM UTC
I’ll give you another clue: The Axis design concept never made it to the prototype stage.
VR, Russ
Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
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Posted: Monday, January 27, 2020 - 04:08 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I'll give it a shot:


Quoted Text

Name the aircraft



Interstate XBDR


Quoted Text

the “first”



The first jet powered assault drone


Quoted Text

the Axis design concept



The Horten Ho 229


Quoted Text

two of the three unique innovations incorporated in the aircraft



1. flying wing with small vertical stabilizer
2. ?






Nope, not a drone. Time for another clue I guess: Initially piloted by a USMC Reservist, who had some unusual assistance at first.
VR, Russ
ReluctantRenegade
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Posted: Sunday, January 26, 2020 - 10:47 PM UTC
I'll give it a shot:


Quoted Text

Name the aircraft



Interstate XBDR


Quoted Text

the “first”



The first jet powered assault drone


Quoted Text

the Axis design concept



The Horten Ho 229


Quoted Text

two of the three unique innovations incorporated in the aircraft



1. flying wing with small vertical stabilizer
2. ?



ReluctantRenegade
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Wien, Austria
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Posted: Sunday, January 26, 2020 - 10:34 PM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

The last two pages don't work for me. Anyone else with the same problem?



They seem to be covered by the “reply/comment blocks”, but your response went to the right place. I select the page number (215) from the colored background posting on Kitmaker. You are in the right place, maybe an editor can shorten the pages at the bottom of the block. But I’m not sure anyone is paying attention. This subject has been a rather long one, and I notice not very many new folks are “playing” anymore, seems it’s just the same five or six of us over the last few pages. Time to retire it?
VR, Russ



OK, somehow I've got it work. I don't think the thread should be retired - it will retire itself anyway if there will be no players. Maybe we should make it more attractive in some way...?
Kevlar06
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Posted: Sunday, January 26, 2020 - 11:18 AM UTC
Darrell, sorry, no, not the answer, but you’re getting warmer. Again, some of the features of what I’m looking for are subtle. In fact, the Sea Dart does share at least one of those features, as well as some other operational “commonality”.
VR, Russ
2002hummer
#257
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Ontario, Canada
Joined: October 11, 2011
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Posted: Sunday, January 26, 2020 - 10:10 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Ok! This one has been on my mind lately for some reason, so here goes!

Here are the clues:

1) Innovative aircraft designed to support Naval operations without an aircraft carrier, established a notable “first”.
2) Two engines.
3) The concept behind it’s use was based on a late WWII Axis design.
4) It was a member of a particular “class” of aircraft with three unique features (for the time).

Name the aircraft, Convair XF2Y SeaDart
the “first”,supersonic interceptor seaplane
the Axis design concept, ???
and two of the three unique innovations incorporated in the aircraft. 1 The aircraft took off and landed on a pair of retractable hydro-skis
2 The aircraft was fitted with a set of dive brakes on the lower rear fuselage which also doubled as water brakes and as a water rudder while taxiing on the surface 3 The aircraft was fitted with a set of dive brakes on the lower rear fuselage which also doubled as water brakes and as a water rudder while taxiing on the surface


Enjoy!
VR, Russ

Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
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KitMaker: 3,494 posts
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Posted: Sunday, January 26, 2020 - 05:44 AM UTC

Quoted Text

The last two pages don't work for me. Anyone else with the same problem?



They seem to be covered by the “reply/comment blocks”, but your response went to the right place. I select the page number (215) from the colored background posting on Kitmaker. You are in the right place, maybe an editor can shorten the pages at the bottom of the block. But I’m not sure anyone is paying attention. This subject has been a rather long one, and I notice not very many new folks are “playing” anymore, seems it’s just the same five or six of us over the last few pages. Time to retire it?
VR, Russ