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General Aircraft: Tips & Techniques
Discussions on specific A/C building techniques.
Tips on spraying white
BuffaloModeler
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New York, United States
Joined: November 13, 2007
KitMaker: 66 posts
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Posted: Sunday, September 07, 2008 - 08:26 AM UTC
Can anyone recommend a white paint or technique which ensures good coverage. I'm currently building a Hasegawa F-8 Crusader in 1960's colors. I prefer using Model Master acryl paint and I'm not getting good coverage over a base coat of light grey. Any suggestions?

Thanks,

John Z
alpha_tango
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Germany
Joined: September 07, 2005
KitMaker: 5,609 posts
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Posted: Sunday, September 07, 2008 - 08:42 AM UTC
Hi John

flat white normally sprays like every other color. make many thin coats.

If you need high gloss finishes it is more difficult . I would start with a flat paint, polishing it with a cloth when dry and adding several very thin layers of the gloss white. Take care that the last is a wet layer (but still very thin to avoid pooling and runs)

airliner modellers know maybe some better ways ....

If you talk about brush painting: I have no idea

all the best

Steffen
BuffaloModeler
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New York, United States
Joined: November 13, 2007
KitMaker: 66 posts
AeroScale: 14 posts
Posted: Sunday, September 07, 2008 - 08:50 AM UTC
Danke, Steffen

I wouldn't even consider brush painting! Thanks for the tips and I'll give them a try. If this works well, I'll dig out my Revell AG Breguet Atlantique and give it a try.

John Z
tachikawa
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Washington, United States
Joined: June 07, 2008
KitMaker: 40 posts
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Posted: Sunday, September 07, 2008 - 08:57 AM UTC
Whether you use flat or gloss white the deal is put it on in thin coats and build up enough coats until you like the coverage.


The back end of this 1955 Bel Air was sprayed with gloss white lacquer built up with numerous coats and then polished out.


This Boeing 737-400 was also sprayed with successive coats of white until I got the coverage I was looking for.

HTH

Glenn
BuffaloModeler
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New York, United States
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Posted: Sunday, September 07, 2008 - 09:01 AM UTC
So, if the paint is pooling is it too thin or being sprayed too heavily? Nice work!
alpha_tango
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Germany
Joined: September 07, 2005
KitMaker: 5,609 posts
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Posted: Sunday, September 07, 2008 - 09:11 AM UTC
Hi John

You should dust on the first layers that means you chose a distance where the paint can dry a bit before it hits the surface.. That way you will have a good white coverage before you achieve the gloss effect.

For running and pooling it is most probably a matter of how much color you shoot on the surface i.e. too thick layers.

Practice!

cheers

Steffen
BuffaloModeler
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New York, United States
Joined: November 13, 2007
KitMaker: 66 posts
AeroScale: 14 posts
Posted: Sunday, September 07, 2008 - 09:12 AM UTC
Okay, now I understand...distance and patience. Thanks very much.
tachikawa
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Washington, United States
Joined: June 07, 2008
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Posted: Sunday, September 07, 2008 - 09:16 AM UTC

Quoted Text

So, if the paint is pooling is it too thin or being sprayed too heavily? Nice work!



It shouldn't be pooling or dripping or running. I'd say either it's too thin and/or you're holding the airbrush too close to the item being painted or holding it on the same spot too long so that the paint builds up too fast and runs. For me successive coats means misting it on, maybe, 8-10 times or more. Depends on what color you're covering up underneath. Wish it were a science but it's more an artform. You'll get the idea. Keep at it!

Glenn
BuffaloModeler
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New York, United States
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Posted: Sunday, September 07, 2008 - 09:22 AM UTC
Thanks, Glenn...I'll have at it and let you know how I make out
alpha_tango
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Germany
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Posted: Sunday, September 07, 2008 - 10:31 AM UTC
Also: prepare the parts! wash them or rub the parts with alcohol, to get rid of all the mold release agents, fingerprints and other dirt or oil. Somtimes it is helpfull to use a primer .. but that can make thing more difficult. If you use enamels these should have enough bite to stick to the parts. I use acrylics when it is more difficult in places.

cheers

Steffen