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Book Review
135
Dingo Mk. 1b
Step-By-Step Finishing British Armor: Dingo Mk.1b, 7th Armored Div. Libya, 1942
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by: Bill Cross [ BILL_C ]


Originally published on:
Armorama

introduction

The Daimler Mk.1b scout car is probably one of the most-recognized armored cars from World War Two. The nickname "Dingo" (after the Australian wild dog, and not, as rumored, after an episode of "Seinfeld") actually came from a competitor's design that wasn't chosen by the British War Office. The name seems appropriate, especially for a vehicle that gained its greatest fame in the North African desert. Its light weight, good power train and decent armor (30mm) made it an excellent reconnaissance vehicle, and it served right from the BEF during the 1940 Battle of France right up until 1952.

Master modeler Glenn Bartolotti has made the Dingo the subject of his latest in the "Step-by-Step Finishing Armor" series.

what you get

As with the other entries in this series, you receive a 14-pade PDF file with color pictures.

the review

As with the other booklets in this series, you are taken step-by-step (hence the name) from finished plastic kit through painting and weathering. The paint colors and brands are called out, as are the weathering materials (provided by MIG and plugged generously). The nods to MIG products might strike some as a little heavy-handed, but having used MIG powders and oils, I can't fault Glenn for linking up with a very good vendor to promote this series. For the price ($1.95), it's a real deal, so presumably some corporate sponsorship helps this happen.

Even the novice modeler can learn a lot from this booklet, including some basic "chipping" technique. One of the biggest stumbling blocks to using advanced weathering techniques is knowing what materials to use. It seems every modeler has his or her own stash of chemicals and powders. Getting started often means waaay too much trial-and-error. This cuts off a lot of time that might be wasted experimenting. A straightforward list with photos like this should help everyone but the most-experienced.

As to the Dingo, it's one of those vehicles that should be in every stash, and the desert weathering techniques will work on Axis vehicles and even modern ones ala Desert Storm.

conclusion

I can't find anything about this booklet that I would fault. The photos are large, clear and detailed, and the techniques and materials are specified so that even a rank beginner can get good results.

This review sample was provided by Glenn Bartolotti. Please be sure to mention you saw it reviewed on Armorama when ordering.

SUMMARY
Highs: A complete master class in a single lesson that will teach you how to build a specific model like a master.
Lows: None.
Verdict: For the money, you can't go wrong.
Percentage Rating
95%
  Scale: 1:35
  Mfg. ID: Vol. 26
  Suggested Retail: $1.95
  Related Link: 
  PUBLISHED: Nov 22, 2011
  NATIONALITY: United Kingdom
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 90.08%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 89.67%

Our Thanks to Armor Models by Glenn Bartolotti!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.

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About Bill Cross (bill_c)
FROM: NEW JERSEY, UNITED STATES

Self-proclaimed rivet counter who gleefully builds tanks, planes and has three subs in the stash.

Copyright 2019 text by Bill Cross [ BILL_C ]. Images also by copyright holder unless otherwise noted. Opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of AeroScale. All rights reserved.



Comments

Thanks Bill for a well written review. I see that it's Volume 26 any idea what were some of the earlier issues were ? And from who can we order Glen's booklet ? Thanks and have a great Thanksgiving everybody ! Tom
NOV 21, 2011 - 06:52 PM
you can order it from Glen's website. Just google his name.
NOV 21, 2011 - 07:29 PM
   

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