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1700
Battle of Trafalgar, in 1/700 Scale

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"MSW crew-mate Rob Kernaghan (RKernaghan) shares a fine diorama scene of the Battle of Trafalgar, in this photo feature!"

The kits are Skytrex all metal Trafalgar Series, and feature HMS Victory, Temaraire, and Neptune.

There are two French ships, the Beaucenture, and Redoutable.

The composition is taken from the famous painting and shows HMS Victory breaking away from the fray aided by Temaraire.

Note that Beaucenture is all but finished whereas HMS Neptune is left virtually without a scratch.

The Battle of Trafalgar (/trə'fælɡər/, formerly /træfəl'ɡɑr/), fought on October 21, 1805, was part of the War of the Third Coalition assembled by Britain against France. It was the most significant naval battle of the Napoleonic Wars and a pivotal naval battle of the nineteenth century.

A Royal Navy fleet of 27 ships of the line destroyed an allied French and Spanish fleet of 33 ships of the line west of Cape Trafalgar in south-west Spain. The French and Spanish lost 22 ships, while the British lost none. The British commander Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson died late in the battle, by which time he had ensured his place in history as Britain's greatest naval hero.

The British victory spectacularly confirmed the naval supremacy that Britain had established during the eighteenth century. Many believe that the battle prevented France from invading England. However, by the time it was fought, Napoleon had abandoned his plans to invade southern England and instead was successfully fighting in Germany against Britain's allies.

Britain's sea-power would continue through until the end of World War II, and during two World Wars would play a major role in the defense of freedom and democracy against tyranny and oppression. The memory and legacy of Trafalgar became part of the heritage of Britain's navy. In times of hardship and difficulty, sailors would remember Nelson's words, and, even in the face of superior force, would do their duty.
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About the Author

About Robert Kernaghan (RKernaghan)


Comments

A model ship story waiting to be told for such a long time, and who better to tell it than he who is always spot on with detail, and the master craftsman himself, Rob Kernaghan. I also had the pleasure of providing the photgraphic survey of this fine build. Peter F
MAY 09, 2010 - 08:26 PM
Beautiful work Rob!
MAY 10, 2010 - 12:24 PM
A great looking scene with some really fine rigging considering the scale. Only thing missing is the smoke Lovely work sir... steve
MAY 10, 2010 - 05:30 PM
What a wonderful display! I love it when scenes are made with attention to actual events and I can't wait to see Rob tackle a project like Lepanto. --Karl
MAY 11, 2010 - 06:19 AM
wonderful work! thanks for sharing
MAY 13, 2010 - 12:39 AM