login   |    register
Modeling Questions?
Ask your modeling related questions here.
Drilling takes really long
Lada_Niva
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Drenthe, Netherlands
Joined: October 06, 2019
KitMaker: 138 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Monday, December 16, 2019 - 05:40 AM UTC
Hello fellow members,

Today I did continue on my project the Tamiya JSU-152/ISU-152.
And I had to drill quite a lot off holes, but particularly with the 0,5 or 0,8 drill bit. Don't exactly know how large it was.
It was the smallest. But it took quite a lot off time if you ask me.
15 minutes or more for one hole. Is that normal? Or is there something wrong with the drills? Do they have to be sharp?

Hope you guys can help me with this,

Lada_Niva
Kevlar06
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 3,411 posts
AeroScale: 798 posts
Posted: Monday, December 16, 2019 - 06:14 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Hello fellow members,

Today I did continue on my project the Tamiya JSU-152/ISU-152.
And I had to drill quite a lot off holes, but particularly with the 0,5 or 0,8 drill bit. Don't exactly know how large it was.
It was the smallest. But it took quite a lot off time if you ask me.
15 minutes or more for one hole. Is that normal? Or is there something wrong with the drills? Do they have to be sharp?

Hope you guys can help me with this,

Lada_Niva



I learned a life-lesson many years ago— don’t buy cheap drill bits. The cheaper they are, the duller they are. Buy only “top of the line” drill bits and you won’t be disappointed buy ragged holes, tear-outs, melted plastic, broken bits and long drill times (like you’ve experienced). Off hand, I’d say if it takes 15 minutes to drill through plastic, I’d say you bit is dull— really dull. Unfortunately, the only thing you can do for a dull bit is to replace it. I’ve heard of folks trying to sharpen bits, but it really doesn’t work for bits that small.
VR, Russ
Lada_Niva
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Drenthe, Netherlands
Joined: October 06, 2019
KitMaker: 138 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Monday, December 16, 2019 - 06:42 AM UTC
Thank you for the quick reply.
Do you have any mark or name in mind that produces good quality drill bits?
I was thinking off wanting some bits off Tamiya, because I have a side cutter off Tamiya. And it really is a nice piece off tool.
And is really fine to use, so Tamiya? Or another name that I can buy in the modelling shop?

Thanks again,

Lada_Niva
ChurchSTSV
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Arizona, United States
Joined: September 20, 2017
KitMaker: 350 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Monday, December 16, 2019 - 08:29 AM UTC
I have a small hand drill I got off of eBay and it takes me forever to drill out portholes. This may very well be the reason and I need better bits.
RobinNilsson
Staff MemberTOS Moderator
KITMAKER NETWORK
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: November 29, 2006
KitMaker: 6,170 posts
AeroScale: 19 posts
Posted: Monday, December 16, 2019 - 09:08 AM UTC
A friend of mine tried to drill a hole in aluminium.
He thought it took forever so he changed the drill bit.
No change so he used a router bit instead.
The aluminium piece was still not impressed.
In pure desperation he tried a small grinding disc.
The grinding disc promply unscrewed itself from the holder (mandrel).
Now it dawned on him that he had run the electric drill with reverse rotation the last time he used it .....

/ Robin
Kevlar06
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 3,411 posts
AeroScale: 798 posts
Posted: Monday, December 16, 2019 - 10:55 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Do you have any mark or name in mind that produces good quality drill bits?



I buy Micro-bits from Grainger Industrial supply here in the US. They're not cheap, but they last, and are always sharp. I don't know what kind of industrial supply stores you may have in the Netherlands. But you might start with firms that do machining or electronic component supply. Here are some brands to look for that make micro-carbide, cobalt or steel bits:

Kyocera
Hertel
M. A. Ford
Guhring

Here's a link to Grainger Supply: https://www.grainger.com/search?searchBar=true&searchQuery=micro+drill+bits

For larger bits. I sometimes use either Tamiya or Academy bits chucked in a small pin vise, they seem to be OK, but still wear out over time. But overall, the modeling companies don't do micro-bits very well. Be aware, even hardened carbide or steel micro bits will break if not used properly. When I'm really engaged in building, I go through at least a dozen or more micro-bits a year. Good Luck,
VR, Russ
Kevlar06
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 3,411 posts
AeroScale: 798 posts
Posted: Monday, December 16, 2019 - 11:02 AM UTC

Quoted Text

A friend of mine tried to drill a hole in aluminium.
He thought it took forever so he changed the drill bit.
No change so he used a router bit instead.
The aluminium piece was still not impressed.
In pure desperation he tried a small grinding disc.
The grinding disc promply unscrewed itself from the holder (mandrel).
Now it dawned on him that he had run the electric drill with reverse rotation the last time he used it .....

/ Robin



Robin, that's a funny story I can relate to. Good thing I only have one slow speed drill that runs in reverse-- and its hard to get the two directions mixed up. Most of my small scale-slow speed drilling is done with a reversible Micro-Mark drill or for heavier faster jobs I use a Dremel. But a pin vise is always best when working in plastic--you know the speed and direction on those for sure!
VR, Russ
timmyp
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Virginia, United States
Joined: May 18, 2008
KitMaker: 439 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Tuesday, December 17, 2019 - 10:53 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Hello fellow members,

Today I did continue on my project the Tamiya JSU-152/ISU-152.
And I had to drill quite a lot off holes, but particularly with the 0,5 or 0,8 drill bit. Don't exactly know how large it was.
It was the smallest. But it took quite a lot off time if you ask me.
15 minutes or more for one hole. Is that normal? Or is there something wrong with the drills? Do they have to be sharp?

Hope you guys can help me with this,

Lada_Niva



Hello Lada_Niva,

I'm guessing the drill size is in millimeters? And were you using an electric drill, or a hand drill? Either way, it should not take 15 minutes to drill through styrene.

As I read all these posts, I got to wondering if there is such a thing as left-hand twist drill bits - similar to some nuts and bolts that are left-hand threaded. If there are those kind of bits, and you have a set of them, that could explain why it took 15 minutes to drill a hole.

And this thread got me to thinking about what kind of drill bits I have - so I looked at the little drill stand the bits came in, and on the bottom, it says they were made by Elmer's Manufacturing, China. I don't remember what brand they were sold under. I've had them for probably a dozen years, and they're still going strong.

Maybe, if your drill bits are a new purchase, you should go back to the seller and either get a refund, or replacement bits.

Cheers,

Tim
southpier
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Alberta, Canada
Joined: December 11, 2009
KitMaker: 536 posts
AeroScale: 16 posts
Posted: Tuesday, December 17, 2019 - 09:50 PM UTC
left (counter clock-wise) cutting drill bits are used for screw removal:

https://www.harborfreight.com/left-hand-drill-bit-set-13-pc-61686.html


Lada_Niva
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Drenthe, Netherlands
Joined: October 06, 2019
KitMaker: 138 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Wednesday, December 18, 2019 - 08:34 AM UTC
Thank you all for the good replys.
And I must say they are very usefull to me.
It confirms what I already thought, that drilling shouldn't take that long.
The websites you gave me aren't much use to me, because I'm not living in the United States.
Some general advice or tips and tricks would be more usefull to me.
That will give me a general idea where to look for the right parts.
I have tried to rotate my 'pin vice' is it called? The other way,
but I thought that wouldn't work.
I believe that my drill bits are drilling counter clockwise.
Using my watch as a indication method.
The smallest bit, the 0,5 mm or 0,8 mm I don't exactly the size off them, are taking the longest time for me to drill with.

Anyway, thank you all for the replys so far,

Lada_Niva
Vicious
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Queensland, Australia
Joined: September 04, 2015
KitMaker: 1,453 posts
AeroScale: 75 posts
Posted: Thursday, December 19, 2019 - 11:16 PM UTC
https://drillbitsunlimited.com/ Fast shipping,super quality and they have sets discounted for model makers,drill styrene like butter
ivanhoe6
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Wisconsin, United States
Joined: April 05, 2007
KitMaker: 1,928 posts
AeroScale: 81 posts
Posted: Friday, December 20, 2019 - 01:54 AM UTC
A little while ago I bought a set of Tungsten Steel 0.4 to1.3mm drill bits that Meng was selling ( I think the company who made it was DSPIAE). They came in a great plastic carrying case. I've only used them a few times and was pleased with the results. But, they are sharp & brand new. I haven't used them enough to find out how long they'll stay sharp.
You can never go wrong with good quality tools. It hurts the wallet at first but you shouldn't go through what you went through using good quality tools.
Scarred
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: March 11, 2016
KitMaker: 1,565 posts
AeroScale: 27 posts
Posted: Friday, December 20, 2019 - 07:20 AM UTC
Drill bits should be cutting in the clock wise direction. I suggest you invest in a Dremel with a flexi-shaft and a 4486 chuck. You won't regret it.
Lada_Niva
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Drenthe, Netherlands
Joined: October 06, 2019
KitMaker: 138 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Tuesday, February 18, 2020 - 05:23 AM UTC
Interesting to read.
I will be taking a look into it when I will need this type off equipment again.