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Aircraft Trivia Quiz 2 (Join In)
pigsty
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Posted: Thursday, October 11, 2018 - 07:11 AM UTC

Quoted Text

On 9 July 1944 a Royal Navy Avenger downed a V-1 flying bomb.

Cheers

Karl.



Bingo! I'd love to know more about it ...

You have control, over.
Heatnzl
#435
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Nelson, New Zealand
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Posted: Wednesday, October 10, 2018 - 11:48 AM UTC
On 9 July 1944 a Royal Navy Avenger downed a V-1 flying bomb.

Cheers

Karl.
Rimfireroscoe
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Posted: Wednesday, October 10, 2018 - 10:02 AM UTC
First combat use / sinking using air dropped acoustic buoy?
pigsty
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Posted: Tuesday, October 09, 2018 - 07:20 AM UTC
Another clue: the aircraft involved was American and was usually associated with aircraft carriers.
Merlin
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#017
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Posted: Thursday, October 04, 2018 - 07:35 AM UTC
Hi there

The U-Boat saga definitely deserves a brownie-point, even if it's not the actual answer. That is a truly bizarre coincidence - and a great bit of sleuthing to find it!

All the best

Rowan
pigsty
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Posted: Thursday, October 04, 2018 - 07:21 AM UTC
Time for a clue.

The unit involved wasn't part of the RAF, but it was nonetheless part of Coastal Command.
pigsty
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Posted: Tuesday, October 02, 2018 - 07:12 AM UTC
That's a bit quirky, I'll grant you, but as submarines were basically Coastal Command's stock-in-trade, it's not unusual enough.
2002hummer
#257
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Ontario, Canada
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Posted: Monday, October 01, 2018 - 02:50 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Go on, then, I'll give it a whirl.

In July 1944, what was Coastal Command's most unusual kill? Extra points for listing all the elements that made it odd.


was it a Sunderland flown by F/l marrows. During the battle two other aircraft distracted the U-Boat gunners allowing Marrow to attack and sink the third. His bombs straddled the U;Boat thus sinking it. What makes it unusual is the Sunderland's markings were 461U while the U-Boat was U461. U-461 was a supply sub.
pigsty
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Posted: Monday, October 01, 2018 - 07:15 AM UTC
Go on, then, I'll give it a whirl.

In July 1944, what was Coastal Command's most unusual kill? Extra points for listing all the elements that made it odd.
2002hummer
#257
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Posted: Saturday, September 29, 2018 - 08:56 AM UTC
Any takers. Questions are open
2002hummer
#257
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Posted: Monday, September 10, 2018 - 12:43 PM UTC
Bumpity bump bump bump
2002hummer
#257
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Posted: Sunday, September 02, 2018 - 04:37 PM UTC
You've got it Scott. Thanks for the video Jessie, probably a fairly regular landing condition.
Magpie
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Posted: Sunday, September 02, 2018 - 02:21 PM UTC
Bugger that !
Jessie_C
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Posted: Sunday, September 02, 2018 - 01:39 PM UTC
Here's a very terrible quality vid of a Sea Thing landing on HMCS Fraser in some fairly heavy seas.
Magpie
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Posted: Sunday, September 02, 2018 - 11:57 AM UTC
RAST Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse
aka
"Beartrap" as named by the Canadians when they developed the system between 1955 - 65

"When in position, an operator in the helicopter lowers a wire rope messenger. To this messenger a man on the flight deck attaches a heavier hauldown cable. (A pair of grounded tongs discharges any static electricity in the messenger so that the man won't get a rude jolt.) The messenger and hauldown cable then are drawn into the helicopter through a probe in the helicopter's belly. After the haul-down cable has been locked in position inside the probe, the slack in the cable is taken up. A Landing Control Officer (LCO) on the flight deck controls the haul-down and landing from this point onward. The pilot keeps his helicopter hovering in the correct position over the trap. Like an angler reeling in a jumping trout, the LCO slowly begins to reel in the helicopter. The LCO regulates the rate of descent of the helicopter on the control console. When it is in a position just off the deck, he can then increase the rate during a lull in the ship's motion. He plays the helicopter quickly into the Beartrap where steel jaws snap around the probe and hold the "chopper" securely against any motion the ship might offer. This operation can be performed with the ship rolling as much as 31 ° and with pitching motion as much as 8°."
2002hummer
#257
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Posted: Sunday, September 02, 2018 - 04:22 AM UTC
Time for a hint. The nickname is the same as a piece of equipment that is used by some people against large widlife.
2002hummer
#257
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Posted: Wednesday, August 29, 2018 - 11:27 AM UTC
Boats and Helicopters. What contraption is used to unite the named two machines at sea? What country is credited with inventing it, what is it called and how does it work? Bonus when was it invented?
2002hummer
#257
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Posted: Tuesday, August 28, 2018 - 03:31 PM UTC
I am going to need a day or two so I can find a suitable question.
Jessie_C
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Posted: Tuesday, August 28, 2018 - 03:28 PM UTC
Indeed it was! Walter Beech first owned the Travel Air Company, which produced Models A through 11 (renumbering happened) and the un-numbered Type R "Mystery Ship". After being bought out by Curtiss-Wright, designs 12 through 16 (but not 13) bore the "CW-" prefix. This is a short history of the first 16 of Walter Beech's aircraft.

Thus, the new Beechcraft was the Model 17.

Now, what kind of question can you bedazzle us with?
2002hummer
#257
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Posted: Tuesday, August 28, 2018 - 02:32 PM UTC
Was it the Beechcraft B17 Staggerwing airplane?
Jessie_C
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Posted: Tuesday, August 28, 2018 - 11:46 AM UTC
Try looking a little farther West than Germany.

Design No. 17 first took flight in the height of the depression and in spite of the dire economic times and its luxury market pricing, it made enough money to keep the company going.
Merlin
Staff MemberSenior Editor
AEROSCALE
#017
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Posted: Tuesday, August 28, 2018 - 09:09 AM UTC
Hi Jessie

I still like my original answer. My first thought was "Weird number = company name-change... and who's famous for that?... Willy Messerschmitt..." - Bulls-eye!

All my later searches have hit dead-ends. LOL! I followed some great leads towards (and around) the TSR2 (I'd love that to be the answer! - and it would be much more Sean's cup of tea than my BFW), but they don't tally nearly as neatly as what I hit first time.

All the best

Rowan
Jessie_C
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Posted: Tuesday, August 28, 2018 - 07:36 AM UTC
A bump and a hint. Our mystery company is still making airplanes today.
Jessie_C
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Posted: Monday, August 27, 2018 - 03:16 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I am reminded of the man who had tiny rabbits tattooed on his balding pate. He hoped they looked like hares...




Q: What do you call a group of rabbits all hopping backwards?



A: A receding hare line.
Jessie_C
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Posted: Monday, August 27, 2018 - 03:14 AM UTC
Not the company I have in mind, and the first designation of the SAAB 17 was L 10.

The one I have in mind was design No. 17, preceded by design Nos. 1 - 16.