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Aircraft Trivia Quiz 2 (Join In)
rdt1953
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Posted: Tuesday, August 29, 2017 - 09:35 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

None of you have yet succeeded in the correct answer. So, just to recap:
The aircraft is not one usually associated with the RAF
It is a British built aircraft
It was used to mount an aerial attack whereby it used weapons

As an extra clue:
It was a radial engined aircraft

Good luck


So not a paratroop op then ? That is what comes to my mind when I hear
"airborne attack"
Berwickboy
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Posted: Tuesday, August 29, 2017 - 10:44 AM GMT+7
I understand your point, I was quoting my source material
2002hummer
#257
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Posted: Tuesday, August 29, 2017 - 11:36 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

None of you have yet succeeded in the correct answer. So, just to recap:
The aircraft is not one usually associated with the RAF
It is a British built aircraft
It was used to mount an aerial attack whereby it used weapons

As an extra clue:
It was a radial engined aircraft

Good luck


So not a paratroop op then ? That is what comes to my mind when I hear
"airborne attack"



Would the aircraft be a Fairy Swordfish?
Berwickboy
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Posted: Wednesday, August 30, 2017 - 01:02 AM GMT+7
The aircraft was the Fairey Swordfish. It was from 119 squadron who were used to hunt Biber mini subs in the Schelde Extuary. For more information there is an article in September's issue of Aeroplane.

Congratulations an over to you Darrell
2002hummer
#257
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Posted: Wednesday, August 30, 2017 - 11:05 AM GMT+7
What aircraft is this, who used it and what was its purpose.
janhendriks
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Noord-Brabant, Netherlands
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Posted: Wednesday, August 30, 2017 - 09:37 PM GMT+7
I dare not reply as i failed to come up with a question the last time around and yet have to think of one worthy. The name of the plane is in the picture, did anyone notice the Dutch DAF sevice vehicle in the foreground?
rdt1953
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Posted: Wednesday, August 30, 2017 - 10:23 PM GMT+7

Quoted Text

What aircraft is this, who used it and what was its purpose.



Douglas DC - 4 based car ferry - used by ATL , British United , and Aer Lingus among others
2002hummer
#257
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Posted: Thursday, August 31, 2017 - 03:59 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

What aircraft is this, who used it and what was its purpose.



Douglas DC - 4 based car ferry - used by ATL , British United , and Aer Lingus among others


You've got it Richard. Next question.
rdt1953
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Posted: Thursday, August 31, 2017 - 08:44 AM GMT+7
A while back my wife and kids bought me a full aerobatic ride in an open cockpit bi plane - 1940ish WACO YMF. After the preflight briefing/ parachute pep talk the last thing the pilot instructed me to do before strapping in was to tuck my shirt in - why ?
Merlin
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#017
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Posted: Thursday, August 31, 2017 - 09:35 AM GMT+7
Hi Richard

It looks like you're trying to hide "middle aged spread" like some of the rest of us if you leave your shirt un-tucked?

All the best

Rowan
rdt1953
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Posted: Thursday, August 31, 2017 - 10:40 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

Hi Richard

It looks like you're trying to hide "middle aged spread" like some of the rest of us if you leave your shirt un-tucked?

All the best

Rowan



LOL - true enough Rowan but not what I'm looking for !
Berwickboy
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Posted: Thursday, August 31, 2017 - 10:58 AM GMT+7
to prevent you getting cramps from the blasts of cold air in an open cockpit?
Jessie_C
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Posted: Thursday, August 31, 2017 - 11:09 AM GMT+7
There are 2 reasons, one more important than the other:

1) You don't want your shirt to peel up and cover your face when you're upside down.

2) You don't want it to turn into a mini parachute if your airplane breaks and you have to get out and walk home from altitude.
rdt1953
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Posted: Thursday, August 31, 2017 - 12:16 PM GMT+7
Mike - not for cramps

Jessie - ha - glad you're in this with the right spirit - but no , that's not it.

Is it time for a hint everyone or shall we let it ride a bit longer ? Your call -
Merlin
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#017
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Posted: Friday, September 01, 2017 - 08:17 AM GMT+7
Hi Richard

On a more serious note, I'm guessing it's something to do with a loose shirt risking getting in the way of the release on the seat harness if you need to bale out?

Back in my days in the ATC, everything in our uniform was always firmly tucked in (or else!), - in fact, I think they issued us one-piece flight suits on all our flying days. A bigger preoccupation was trying to stand up semi-straight in a firmly strapped-on parachute without damaging parts we hoped we might need one day! ...

All the best

Rowan
rdt1953
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Posted: Friday, September 01, 2017 - 11:37 AM GMT+7
Hi Rowan - While I have posted this query in what I hope to be a humorous consideration I'm sure the pilots ' and the aircraft owners' concerns were serious- let me say that it has more to do with biology / hygiene than safety. Hint - the lack of a certain small paper sack has much to do with this. Perhaps his final request may offer a further clue - " Don't make a mess in my airplane " - apparently it is more expedient to pull your collar open and tilt your head down than to use a more conventional approach.
Jessie_C
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Posted: Friday, September 01, 2017 - 12:23 PM GMT+7
I'd rather ask him to roll and skid the airplane a bit, and then simply lean over the lee side
rdt1953
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Posted: Saturday, September 02, 2017 - 09:09 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

I'd rather ask him to roll and skid the airplane a bit, and then simply lean over the lee side



I think Jessica has figured this out and while it may not be a direct answer I'm going to declare her the winner ( plus she always poses very interesting questions ) so over to you m'am .

For those who may be wondering I fortunately did not have to use this technique but came oh so close on the Hammerhead !
Jessie_C
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Posted: Saturday, September 02, 2017 - 01:33 PM GMT+7
Okay, I wasn't really trying there but...

What is the airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow?

Or, what is the aerodynamic significance of the Kármán line?
rdt1953
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Posted: Saturday, September 02, 2017 - 11:07 PM GMT+7

Quoted Text

Okay, I wasn't really trying there but...

What is the airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow?

Or, what is the aerodynamic significance of the Kármán line?



Aircraft stay aloft by either one or both of two forces- aerodynamic lift or centrifugal force . ( think of satellites-they have no wings ). As air mass decreases ( thinning) airspeed must increase to maintain lift.
The Karman line is the point in Earths' atmosphere (altitude)where the air is so thin that, using an average of aircraft aerodynamic lift factors, the airspeed needed to maintain lift and the velocity needed to be supported by centrifugal force ( orbital velocity) meet.
Jessie_C
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Posted: Sunday, September 03, 2017 - 02:21 AM GMT+7
Not going near the swallow question. Wise man

Your turn again!
rdt1953
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Posted: Sunday, September 03, 2017 - 02:34 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

Not going near the swallow question. Wise man

Your turn again!



Thanks Jessica- I tip my hat to you yet again in thanks for the great questions you pose - I always learn something new from them.
IIRC the Karman line is also accepted internationally as a jurisdictional boundary as well - all the airspace above a given country belongs to that country up to the Karman line - above it is free airspace for all in much the same way countries recognize offshore boundaries in maritime law.
I'll need a day or two to come up with a question.
Jessie_C
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Posted: Sunday, September 03, 2017 - 03:26 AM GMT+7
In case anyone's still wondering, someone with way too much time on their hands calculated the airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow.
rdt1953
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Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 - 02:25 PM GMT+7

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Not going near the swallow question. Wise man

Your turn again!



Thanks Jessica- I tip my hat to you yet again in thanks for the great questions you pose - I always learn something new from them.
IIRC the Karman line is also accepted internationally as a jurisdictional boundary as well - all the airspace above a given country belongs to that country up to the Karman line - above it is free airspace for all in much the same way countries recognize offshore boundaries in maritime law.
I'll need a day or two to come up with a question.



Sorry for the delay folks - Jessica's queries are a tough act to follow but here goes - I hope I can articulate this adequately.
As aircraft top speeds increased and the gap between landing speeds and top speeds widened designers found it increasingly difficult to create control systems that gave the pilot the same " feel" or kinesthetic sense across the airspeed spectrum as well as progressively reducing the amount of control surface movement relative to the control input by the pilot as airspeed increased.
How did Jiro Horikoshi accomplish this in the Zero ?
raypalmer
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Posted: Thursday, September 07, 2017 - 10:53 AM GMT+7
Spring-loaded tabs?